Women of War, Women of Woe: Joshua and Judges through the Eyes of Nineteenth-Century Female Biblical Interpreters

By Seufert, Matthew | Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, March 1, 2017 | Go to article overview

Women of War, Women of Woe: Joshua and Judges through the Eyes of Nineteenth-Century Female Biblical Interpreters


Seufert, Matthew, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society


Women of War, Women of Woe: Joshua and Judges through the Eyes of Nineteenth-Century Female Biblical Interpreters. Edited by Marion Ann Taylor and Christiana de Groot. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2016, 288 pp., $35.00 paper.

The book Women of War, Women of Woe "features nineteenth-century British and American women's reflections on eight female figures in Joshua and Judges: Rahab, Achsah [Caleb's daughter], Deborah, Jael, Manoah's wife, Jephthah's daughter, Delilah, and the Levite's concubine" (p. 15). There are eight chapters, in that "each figure merits a chapter" (p. 15). Thirty-five different knowledgeable, intelligent, and creative authors produce a total of 58 reflections. The reflections on Rahab, Deborah, Jael, and Jephthah's daughter occupy about 70% of the book's main part, which is preceded by an 18-page introductory essay by the book's editors summarizing the book's content, contributions, and purpose: "to fill the painful lacuna of missing female voices in the history of biblical interpretation" (p. ix).

The editors' voices themselves are not confined to this essay. They provide an introductory summary of the story of each of the eight biblical figures, as well as a summary and analysis of the contributions of the ensuing reflections on that figure. In addition, they introduce every reflection with a brief biography of the nineteenth-century author and a summary and commentary of each contribution. The nineteenth-century authors, unfortunately, are not allowed their full voice, in that they are intermixed with the commentary of the editors every step of the way. The book has much value in exposing the current generation to the faith, insight, and hermeneutical method of women of the past. The majority of these women held that the Bible is God's word and taught that the OT narratives point to Christ and teach lessons of piety. Reading their writings was refreshing in our age of skepticism and higher criticism. However, their voices are noticeably altered by recruiting them to promote a feminist agenda. As an example, in introducing Etty Woosnam's reflection on Rahab, the editors comment, "Woosnam suggests that while 'men' continue to attribute old sins to reformed characters, God forgets our sins" (pp. 41-42). Their evaluation, which indicts men for failing to forgive as God forgives and suggests that women are untainted by this particular sin, refracts the sound of Woosnam's own voice. Woosnam, in the following sentence of her reflection, says that "the world thus brands us indelibly" (p. 44, italics mine). The world does not forgive as God does. Men and women are together in this. It is ironic that in an attempt to equalize male and female, the editors feel the need here to subordinate men. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Women of War, Women of Woe: Joshua and Judges through the Eyes of Nineteenth-Century Female Biblical Interpreters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.