Past Performance System Raises Eyebrows

National Defense, October 1999 | Go to article overview

Past Performance System Raises Eyebrows


Past Performance

Earlier this year, the department issued its Past Performance Guide that is designed to help both industry and government understand and use the system. Specifically, the guide was designed to articulate key techniques and practices for the use and collection of past performance information. In addition, the guide would serve as a source-selection tool and encourage the use of innovative techniques in acquiring the best-value goods and services.

With the implementation of this reference tool to evaluate contractor performance, questions have surfaced regarding the ultimate confidentiality of past-performance information once obtained and certain inconsistencies with the application of the source-selection tool. NDIA is working alongside the Defense Department to ensure that the Past Performance Guide is implemented properly, while ensuring the fair treatment of NDIA corporate members. NDIA has surveyed its members regarding the specific problems or shortcomings of this tool and will be meeting with the appropriate senior officials at the Defense Department to address the issue.

Public-Private Competition

Currently, the federal government follows OMB Circular A-76 as its blueprint for conducting public-private competitions for the provision of goods and services. This policy, administered by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), requires federal agencies to submit a list of services that are commercial in nature. A-76 provides an overview of the procedures for determining whether a service is commercial in nature and the methods federal agencies should use for awarding a contract. To facilitate implementation of A76, OMB periodically has requested that agencies submit a list of services that meet these criteria. In the past, such requests have been ignored.

Unfair government competition with the private sector in the area of commercial activities or inherently non-governmental functions led to last year's enactment of the Federal Activities Inventory Reform Act (FAIR), (PL. 105-270). The FAIR Act mandates that the goods and services deemed commercial in nature should be open to competition. However, the FAIR Act does exempt activities which are inherently governmental functions, including those (1) critical to national security; (2) where the private sector has failed to meet government needs or functions; and (3) where the government has demonstrated best value to the taxpayer.

The key requirement of the FAIR Act is an annual agency submission of a commercial activities inventory. The first inventory was submitted by agencies to OMB by June 30. Once the inventories are released (at press time, they were expected to be made available by the end of September), they are subject to appeals by both unions and private industry.

NDIA has requested corporate members' input on their experiences with government competition for commercial activities.

Veteran-Owned Small Business

House Small Business Committee Chairman Jim Talent, R-Texas, introduced HR 1568, the Veterans Entrepreneurship and Small Business Development Act of 1999, in order to provide technical, financial and procurement assistance to veteran-owned small businesses. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Past Performance System Raises Eyebrows
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.