In-Line/On-Line: Fundamentals of the Internet and the World Wide Web

By Rauff, James V. | Mathematics and Computer Education, Fall 1999 | Go to article overview

In-Line/On-Line: Fundamentals of the Internet and the World Wide Web


Rauff, James V., Mathematics and Computer Education


IN-LINE/ON-LINE: FUNDAMENTALS OF THE INTERNET AND THE WORLD WIDE WEB

by Raymond Greenlaw and Ellen Hepp WCB/McGraw-Hill, 1999, 549 pp.

In-line/On-line: Fundamentals of the Internet and the World Wide Web is a well-written and well-organized introductory overview of the internet and the World Wide Web designed for students and the independent learner. The book would be suitable for a course on the Internet, as a recommended read for students wishing to become more directly involved in Internet computing, or as a reference for anyone who has more than a passing interest in the Internet and web programming.

The text covers all the Internet bases. The use of the wide variety of Internet facilities is given serious and even discussion, along with programming and web design issues.

The discussion of e-mail includes discussions of mailers, mail servers, SMTP (simple mail transfer protocol), IMAP (interactive mail access protocol), MIME types (multipurpose internet mail extensions), as well as the architecture of e-mail systems and pointers on e-mail etiquette. There are also discussions of telnet, FTP, web browsers, search engines, newsgroups, mailing lists, chat rooms, web security, and viruses that, though sometimes brief, provide the reader with a solid understanding and launching point for deeper investigation. A unique feature of the book is the inclusion of a discussion of MUDs (multi-user dimension) and its myriad subsets, including role-playing MUDs, combat MUDs, social MUDs, and educational MUDs. There is also a chapter on electronic publishing, which includes discussions of copyrights and plagiarism. …

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