Russian Organized Crime

By Zalisko, Walter | Law & Order, October 1999 | Go to article overview

Russian Organized Crime


Zalisko, Walter, Law & Order


Trafficking in women, and the Government's response

White slavery rings have thrived on the exploitation of women and children from developing countries for years. Young Asian women have been a commodity for decades. However, rising unemployment, poverty and a weakened social structure have caused the Newly Independent Countries - Ukraine and Russia in particular - to become the latest targets for the recruitment of women and children into sexual slavery and as indentured servants.

Trafficking in women and children is a form of modem day slavery. When a woman or child is trafficked or sexually exploited, they are denied the most basic human rights - in the worst case, their right to life.

Law enforcement sources report a dramatic increase in this problem over the last two years in the New Jersey and New York area. These women are recruited, managed and transported by Russian Organized Crime (ROC) syndicates into the United States, and other countries, and used primarily as sex slaves, go-go dancers and indentured household workers.

Why are Russian Organized Crime syndicates involved in the trafficking of women and children? Because prostitution and the trafficking in human beings has become a six billion dollar a year business of choice for Russian organized crime. Why that business flourishes in the United States deserves closer scrutiny.

The tri-state region of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania has long been one of the top areas in the United States for the relocation of Russian emigres. Along with bringing hard working and upright emigres, this relocation brought the ROC syndicate and other small time criminals to the area as well.

In the former Soviet Union, personal wealth, privilege, dachas and diamonds rested on control of goods and services illegally diverted from the State and exchanged for other illegally diverted goods and services in vast and complex patterns of bribery, corruption and blackmail. The ROC came here well schooled in bureaucratic circumvention and with the ability to adapt governmental services for private gain. Common criminal activities committed by ROC include burglary, credit card forgery, theft, auto theft, insurance and medical fraud, fuel tax fraud, arson, prostitution and narcotics trafficking.

The ROC syndicates conduct the most sophisticated criminal operations ever seen in the United States, based on their access to expertise in computer technology, encryption techniques and money-laundering facilities that process hundreds of millions of dollars. Money and power are obtained through criminal conduct, and then infiltrates legitimate society. ROC members tend to be highly educated, and therefore, are very resourceful and sophisticated in their methods of operation.

It is reported that organized crime syndicates from Russia, Asia and Africa are forming alliances with traditional Italian and Latin American organizations, creating a formidable threat to international peace and stability. A great number of ROC gang members are former KGB agents or operatives who are skillfully trained in illicit techniques, including assassination.

To make use of this "talent", other crime syndicates are hiring ROC gang members to conduct their contract killings. While ROC continues to grow in Russia, their operations outside Russia could be categorized into three main classes:

1) Hard penetration. In some countries, such as Poland, Austria, Israel, United States and Canada, it has moved in with a clear goal of establishing itself as a dominant criminal force. In these cases, it has joined forces with local organized crime.

2) Soft penetration. Here they have adopted a more delicate technique. Mostly, because of the threat posed by local law enforcement agencies, or because there is some reason or opportunity to mount a major push.

3) Service penetration. Here they provide key criminal services to other gangs, whether money-laundering or assassination. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Russian Organized Crime
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.