Shaping Identity in Eastern Europe and Russia: Soviet-Russian and Polish Accounts of Ukrainian History, 1941-1991

By Yekelchyk, Serhy | Canadian Slavonic Papers, March 1999 | Go to article overview

Shaping Identity in Eastern Europe and Russia: Soviet-Russian and Polish Accounts of Ukrainian History, 1941-1991


Yekelchyk, Serhy, Canadian Slavonic Papers


Stephen Velychenko. Shaping Identity in Eastern Europe and Russia: Soviet-Russian and Polish Accounts of Ukrainian History, 1914-1991. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1993. 266 pp. Index. Cloth.

This book addresses the long neglected but central problem of Ukrainian historiography-the fact that, until very recently, narratives about the Ukrainian past were shaped by other, dominant nations: Russian, Polish, and "Soviet-Russian." In the past, students of historical writing about Ukraine were concerned primarily with the growth of the Ukrainian historiographic tradition proper. They tended to trace the making of "national historiography" rather than the evolution of "foreign" interpretations which, while appearing authoritative to contemporaries, were being constantly criticized by Ukrainian historians. Stephen Velychenko's thorough studies fill this gap. In 1992, the Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies Press published his National History as Cultural Process: A Survey of the Interpretations of Ukraine's Past in Polish, Russian, and Ukrainian Historical Writing from the Earliest Times to 1914. The book under review carries the inquiry on to the early 1990s.

In Part 1, "Background and Context," Velychenko explains how the category of "national history" acquired its own peculiar meaning in Eastern Europe, why official Soviet history writing should be properly classified as "Soviet-Russian," and how the Party developed and imposed on historians what it thought was "Dialectical Historical Materialism." Part 11, "Polish Historiography," surveys the transformation from the Neoromanticism and Positivism of the interwar period to the Stalinization of scholarship on Ukraine after World War Two and to the subsequent relaxation of ideological control. Paying special attention to the depiction of Polish colonization and Cossack rebellions, Velychenko analyzes in great detail the evolution of general schema and interpretation of particular events in both historical surveys of, and specialized monographs on, Ukraine. Part 111, "Soviet-Russian Historiography," has a slightly different structure. The author first discusses general works on the history of the Soviet Union and Soviet peoples, emphasizing the way these works portrayed the Ukrainian past-primarily Kyivan Rus' and the "reunification" with Muscovy in 1654. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Shaping Identity in Eastern Europe and Russia: Soviet-Russian and Polish Accounts of Ukrainian History, 1941-1991
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.