Strategic Leadership

By Keller, Michael A. | Law & Order, October 2003 | Go to article overview

Strategic Leadership


Keller, Michael A., Law & Order


Mission, vision, values, goals, objectives and strategic planning are just some of the leadership buzzwords of the late 20th Century. Virtually all professional executives have attempted to understand what all the buzzwords mean and make them a reality. Few have succeeded and most continue to search for what bridges the gap between leadership theory and leadership reality. That bridge may well be the new buzzwords for the 21st Century: Strategic Leadership.

Strategic leadership is a process that is simple in its basic form, easily applied and has the potential of yielding significant results. Leading strategically means having a comprehensive strategy for the immediate future. Unlike strategic planning, which is long term for the whole organization, strategic leadership is short term designed for the executive and staff.

Since 9/11, doing more with less has been the theme of many organizational budgets. With the economic instability, stock market uncertainty, the war on terrorism and additional military conflicts on the horizon, many organizational priorities have changed. Many organizations are just trying to survive, as budgets have not increased or, worse yet, some have decreased. As a result, leaders are again called upon to be creative as they strive to accomplish their goals. Strategic leadership offers the professional executive the solution to not only accomplish more with less but by doing less.

Strategic leadership, similar in some respects to strategic planning, is about action, not just a written document that all to often sits on a shelf or in a drawer and is very rarely reviewed. It is a daily process that should be reviewed at staff meetings. Effective strategic leadership is a fluid, dynamic process that requires constant vigilance. Integral to the success of Strategic Leadership is the POLICE Leadership Methodology: Planning, Organizing, Liability, Information, Control and Ethics. The POLICE Leadership

Methodology ensures that the strategic leadership process is grounded on a foundation of accountability. With all of the scandals surrounding CEOs of both public and private organizations, accountability to all stakeholders has come to the forefront and should make strategic leadership very attractive to the professional executive.

The professional executive must take that first step and come to the conclusion that there has to be a better way to accomplish the mission of the organization. The implementation of strategic leadership requires an introspective assessment of the programs, goals and tasks of the organization. Many executives are biased in their assessment, which can degrade the effectiveness of strategic leadership. An outside review offers the best, unbiased assessment to make educated decisions from.

In the second step, the executive is introduced to strategic thinking. Strategic thinking means the executive should question whether or not the department is doing the right thing.

In assessing those forces that can affect or impede the success, the executive and staff will determine the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to each strategy. In particular, the executive must be cognizant of the budgetary restraints and political implications to certain strategies and initiatives.

Every executive in every organization has a vision of what they want to accomplish. Some are more realistic than others. Many executives' desires will not come to fruition, and not because their goals are unrealistic but because so many executives are bogged down with the minutia of leadership and can't get many of the important things done.

During this session the executive is tasked to list what he wants to accomplish for himself and the staff within the next year. The executive is encouraged to shotgun his ideas for the organization regardless of how unrealistic they may be.

At this point, Pareto's 80/20 Rule is introduced. Count Vilfredo Pareto (1848-1923) was an Italian economist who observed that 20% of his fellow countrymen owned 80% of the country's wealth. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Strategic Leadership
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.