Philadelphia Opens Its Doors to the 110th Annual IACP Conference

By Krainik, Peggy Wilkins | Law & Order, October 2003 | Go to article overview

Philadelphia Opens Its Doors to the 110th Annual IACP Conference


Krainik, Peggy Wilkins, Law & Order


The IACP has been around since 1893: the 2003 Conference marks the 110th time IACP members have gathered from around the globe. Its history is rich and its importance realized throughout the profession. And the IACP chose a city rich in American history and honor to host the 2003 Conference.

From October 21-25, Philadelphia, PA, will host the 2003 IACP Conference. Philadelphia is the American city. It was in Philadelphia that the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776; the famous Liberty Bell was rung to gather residents to hear the Declaration's first reading. The roots of revolution grew here, and when the United States seceded from Britain, Philadelphia became the nation's first capital.

Although it now remains the capital of the state of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia's glory has not faded. And the city remains as friendly as always: Philadelphia's nickname, the City of Brotherly Love, is actually the Creek translation of "Phildelphia."

The PPD

The Philadelphia Police Department was started in 1751, although the city's boundaries were not fully formed until 1854 when, under the Act of Consolidation, it totaled 129 square miles. A few years later the department's Harbor Patrol was formed.

In 1881 the first black officer joined the force, followed by the first female matron in 1886. Until the 1890s all police patrolled on foot; the Philadelphia Mounted Patrol rode from 1889 until 1951. In 1906 motorcycles were additional forms of transportation and in 1936 cars were added.

The Philadelphia Police Department of today consists of almost seven thousand officers; it is the fourth largest agency in the United States. It has all of the latest technology to help with its constant flow of emergencies. Sylvester Johnson is the current Police Commissioner.

The PPD has around 20 current anti-crime programs running. Its current projects include: Operation Safe Streets; District Mini-Stations; Drug Task Force and Weed & Seed Program; Police/Clergy Program; DARE; Footbeat Program; Youth Aid Panels; GREAT; Cops Ahead Program; Operation Town Watch; DUI Sobriety Checkpoints; Anti-Graffiti Program; Bicycle Patrol; Off-Road Motorcycle Patrol; SAVE Program; BOND Program; Citizen's Police Academy; Curfew Enforcement; and Truancy Enforcement. For more information on the PPD programs, visit them online at www.ppdonline.com.

High Culture

While in Philadelphia, in addition to the IACP, Philadelphia has more than 18 museums within its city limits to visit. The Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Rodin Museum are the art centers of the city. Philadelphia's history museums include the Atwater Kent Museum and the Civil War Museum, and if the desire for natural history occurs, the city has both the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.

However, if a more unique experience to record a Philadelphia visit is in order, stop by Elfreth's Alley, located between Second and Front Streets. Jeremiah Elfreth was a blacksmith who lived on the street. Residents have occupied the street continually since 1713, which makes it the oldest residential street in the United States. All of the houses were built between 1728 and 1836.

Or, if something a little more interactive is called for, visit the Pretzel Museum, located at 211-213 North Third Street. As soft pretzels are famous around Philadelphia, this museum allows its visitors to learn about the soft pretzel's history with the city, and then make their very own pretzels.

Fireman's Hall is located at 147 North Second Street. This museum is a tribute to the city's firemen. The museum is housed in an old 19th-century fire house, and traces the history of the city's fire department. …

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Philadelphia Opens Its Doors to the 110th Annual IACP Conference
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