CFDD: What's It All About

By Daugherty, Marilynn | Business Credit, February 1995 | Go to article overview

CFDD: What's It All About


Daugherty, Marilynn, Business Credit


If I were asked to describe the NACM Credit and Financial Development Division (CFDD) in one word, that word would be opportunity. CFDD offers endless opportunities to learn, network, and receive the encouragement, support, and guidance needed to assist you in the management of your career.

CFDD became a division of NACM in 1988. With all chapters having a common name and common bylaws, the divisional status gave us much more visibility as a professional organization and more strength in our new unified structure.

The mission of CFDD is to promote active interest in the credit and finance profession, to develop and market educational programs that are vital to the development of the effective professional, and to be a viable force within NACM.

Our current national Board consists of a chairman; vice chairman, promotions; and chairman-elect; vice chairman, education and programs; vice chairman, member services; and an executive director. We have 14 area directors and two Canadian liaisons who are responsible for several chapters in their area and are the chapters' direct link to the national Board.

At present, CFDD has 56 chapters and approximately 2,300 members throughout the United States and four affiliated Canadian groups. Of our 2,300 members, more than 50 percent hold the NACM primary membership for their companies. Many of our members hold one of the three professional designations and are at various levels of responsibility within their companies.

CFDD members have unlimited opportunities to further their education and grow in their profession. For example, the CFDD National Scholarship Program offers the opportunity to attend Mid-Career School, Credit Management Leadership Institute, legislative, national and regional conferences, as well as take NACM self-study courses.

Our local chapters award various scholarships to their members for local seminars, national, and regional conferences, college courses, CAP classes, certification fees, and much more. In the past five years, CFDD national and local chapters have awarded 2,545 scholarships totaling more than $424,000. …

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