Taos Artists and Their Patrons

By Porter, Dean; Ebie, Teresa Hayes et al. | Southwest Art, January 2000 | Go to article overview

Taos Artists and Their Patrons


Porter, Dean, Ebie, Teresa Hayes, Campbell, Suzan, Southwest Art


The northern New Mexico village of Taos, shaped through the centuries by ancient Native American and Hispanic Catholic cultures, is an unusual setting for this study of American art patronage. Yet, above all, patronage is about relationships between artists and those who sponsor the creation of their work, celebrate its existence through exhibitions and critical notice, and acquire it. And in no place did such relationships between artists and their patrons play a more pivotal role in American artists' economic and creative survival during the first half of the 20th century than in this remote mountain community in the Land of Enchantment.

Why did artists go to Taos? What held them there? How did the artists of Taos attract patrons? How were the challenges of living and working in Taos different from those in New York or Chicago or St. Louis-or in other American art colonies-and how did Taos artists respond?

Taos Artists and Their Patrons, 1898-1950 examines artists' age-old dilemmas: how to use every possible resource-of time, energy, and creative impulse-to make art and still manage to pay the bills. How to provide food, clothing, and a warm place to live and work, in most cases not only for themselves but also for their families. And how to fulfill the need, less frequently considered, for emotional support and encouragement: how to fuel the fires of creative passion, feed the spirit, and keep the faith during dark times. In the early years of the art colony, patronage in many guises offered solutions to these dilemmas, making it possible for artists to live and work in Taos.

The American Heritage Dictionary describes a patron as "anyone who supports, protects, or champions; [a] benefactor." As our concept for Taos Artists and Their Patrons developed, the authors took this definition to heart, stretching and even redefining the traditional notion of art patronage to encompass not only monetary support through purchases and commissions but also to include those who fostered-and rewarded-the artists' creative efforts in other, less tangible ways. We identified many kinds of patronage, including individual, corporate, commercial, community, governmental, spousal, and collegial (in innovative ways artists too were one another's patrons). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Taos Artists and Their Patrons
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.