Sex Differences and Similarities in Communication: Critical Essays and Empirical Investigations of Sex and Gender in Interaction

By Solomon, Denise Haunani | Journal of Marriage and Family, November 1999 | Go to article overview

Sex Differences and Similarities in Communication: Critical Essays and Empirical Investigations of Sex and Gender in Interaction


Solomon, Denise Haunani, Journal of Marriage and Family


Sex Differences and Similarities in Communication: Critical Essays and Empirical Investigations of Sex and Gender in Interaction. Daniel J. Canary & Kathryn Dindia (Eds.). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. 1998. 468 pp. ISBN 0-8058-2333-6.

In the preface to Sex Differences and Similarities in Communication, Daniel Canary and Kathryn Dindia preview that "with respect to communicative behavior, men and women are similar in some domains and different in others. The task, then, is to juxtapose similarities and differences." Although these comments capture one goal achieved by this text, the collection of essays accomplishes far more. Across the chapters addressing epistemological issues, providing comprehensive review of the literature, or offering new empirical insights, the authors encourage thoughtful and intellectual engagement in the debate about the nature, prevalence, and import of sex differences in communication.

The majority of the essays verify small sex differences, but suggest that these pale in comparison to the many similarities between males and females. The authors diverge, however, in the extent to which they argue that sex differences are meaningful. Scholars and lay persons need no encouragement to point out trivial sex differences or to magnify the distance between the sexes. They do, however, need to be encouraged to understand the meaning of these differences and our fixation with them. The essays in this volume make substantial progress in this direction.

One important theme that emerges from the text suggests that the polarization of the sexes reflects a perceptual bias or reasoning error. In short, language that draws sharp distinctions along a continuous scale leads to the erroneous exclusion of the middle range. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Sex Differences and Similarities in Communication: Critical Essays and Empirical Investigations of Sex and Gender in Interaction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.