The Texas Counseling Association 1943-1999

TCA Journal, Fall 1999 | Go to article overview

The Texas Counseling Association 1943-1999


The Texas Counseling Association (TCA), originally a part of the Texas State Teachers Association, and later known as the Texas Guidance Association, the Texas Personnel and Guidance Association, and the Texas Association for Counseling and Development, started positioning itself as an important organization within the American counseling profession in the mid 1940's. As a recorded historical contribution marking the counseling profession's continuing commitment to providing effective counseling in the approaching millennium, this issue of the Journal proudly presents a collection from TCA Archives including:

1. A History of the Texas Counseling Association

-Roots: Where and How TCA Began

-Presidents

-Executive Directors

-Millennium Expectations

2. A History of the TCA Journal

-Beginnings

-Awards

-Executive Editors

-Managing Editors

-Editorial Board Members

-Others

III. Farewell to Charlotte McKay

-Guidelines, 1980

-Memories of Charlotte

-Retirement, Guidelines, 1999

The following historical account of the development of TCA was prepared by the 1997 San Antonio Conference Committee and the Texas Counseling Association's Presidential Advisory Committee in celebration of the organization fiftieth anniversary. The authors of this recounting of TCA history preface their writing with the following words:

"The history of an organization is more than time, place and date. It is the people who breathe life into it, shape it, and give it its heart and soul."

Roots: Where and How TCA Began

On November 29, 1947, a group of counselors met for the first time as the "Guidance Section" at the 69th Annual Convention of the Texas State Teachers Association (TSTA) in San Antonio, Texas. Prior to that time, from 1935-1940, interested parties met during the TSTA convention. World War 11 came along and all meetings were discontinued.

In 1943 at the TSTA convention, it was suggested that the vocational guidance personnel start meeting as were other groups of school personnel. Virginia Hofstedler, who would later be known as Dr. Virginia Love, chaired the 1947 meeting of the "Guidance Section" of TSTA. Discussion at this meeting dealt mainly with the establishment of guidance programs in public schools.

Dr. Royal Embree of the University of Texas, and the person who deserves much of the credit for the preservation of TCA's history, was elected chairman for the 1948 meeting to be held in Dallas. He is considered the Association's first president. Dr. Embree served two consecutive terms as president and conducted the 1948 and 1949 meetings. During the 1948 meeting in Dallas. a decision was made to begin moving toward the development of an association. This was brought to fruition at the next annual meeting held in Fort Worth at Thanksgiving, 1949.

A constitution committee began work establishing the constitution and by-laws of the Texas Guidance Association (TGA). By 1950, the TGA constitution was completed by George Beamer, William Truax and John Love, and an organization was born. However, it was still a departmental affiliate of TSTA. That was the same year that Bill Truax began his service as Executive Secretary/Director-an unpaid position he held for nearly 25 years. Following the 1950 conference address, committee reports were given and a business session was conducted. Corinne Britt chaired the 1951 meeting which was conducted in Houston and shared with Deans of Women and mental hygiene groups.

What's in a Name?

In 1953 while an interest section of TSTA, known as the Texas Guidance Association, a meeting was held in El Paso. Earl Koile served as President, and it was through his efforts that the name "Personnel" was added to the Association's title, to bring it in line with the national and other state associations. Under the presidency of Lee Reaves (1953), the association began its efforts to become a state branch of the American Personnel and Guidance Association (APGA). …

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