Corry: The Destroyer That Led the Normandy Invasion

By Redman, Rod E. | Sea Classics, January 2004 | Go to article overview

Corry: The Destroyer That Led the Normandy Invasion


Redman, Rod E., Sea Classics


CORRY: The Destroyer That Led The Normandy Invasion By Lt. (jg) Francis M. McKernon as told to Kevin McKernon 204 Ppgs, Illustrated, 6'' x 9'' Paperback. ISBN: 0-974969809 -$15.95; Easy Rudder Press, PO Box 16392, West Haven, CT 06516; www.easyrudderpress.com

While there will undoubtedly be those who take issue with the tag line that the destroyer USS Carry led the D-Day Allied invasion against the Normandy beaches on 6 June 1944, the fact remains that Carry very definitely was one of those brave little unarmored ships which drew dangerously close to the beachhead to slug it out salvo by salvo against massed German artillery.

After more than an hour of fierce battle, just as the troops began making their way to the beaches, an explosion ripped the Carry apart. Few members followed orders to abandon ship, then struggled for survival for more than two hours in bone-chilling water, while under constant enemy fire. Twenty-four of them lost their lives.

Most history books tell the stark facts of D-Day and the military victories that turned the course of World War Two, but too little has been written about the human side of those larger-than-life events. Fortunately, one of the survivors of the Carry, Lt(Jg) Francis M. McKernon, told the stories in detail to his family. In turn, his son, Kevin McKernon, has preserved the stories for publication.

This book includes the smaller sidelights that are essential to any real-life human drama. …

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