National Council for Black Studies Charts New Course: Reaches out for Internatonal Involvement

By Phillip, Mary-Christine | Black Issues in Higher Education, October 6, 1994 | Go to article overview

National Council for Black Studies Charts New Course: Reaches out for Internatonal Involvement


Phillip, Mary-Christine, Black Issues in Higher Education


National Council For Black Studies Charts New Course: Reaches Out for. International Involvement

by Mary-Christine Phillip

WASHINGTON, DC -- The National Council For Black Studies, Inc. (NCBS) board of directors met here recently to hammer out a series of goals it plans for the organization under new President William Little.

"We would like to expand Black studies in the domestic and international arenas," said Little, who is director of the Department of African American Affairs at California State University-Dominguez Hills. During one workshop session, members talked about forming alliances with other Black groups on campus, as well as with some of the top African American studies scholars not associated with NCBS.

The group also plans to embark on a campaign to broaden the council's membership base on individual and institutional levels.

Just recently, for example, the NCBS sponsored a Summer Institute Program at the University of Ghana-Legon in Accra, Ghana, which represented the first time scholars from Europe and Africa were joint participants in a Black studies effort.

According to its mission statement, the council is a professional organization that "is recognized in academic circles as the authoritative voice on the multidimensional aspects of the African world experience." The organization has dedicated itself to "the institutionalization and perpetuation" of the discipline of African American studies.

The Goals

"By striving to achieve its primary goals of defining, promoting and enriching research and instruction in Black studies, the organization has become a vehicle for advancing the culture and lives of [those of] African descent," said Little. …

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