Mississippi's Coahoma Community College Finally Gets Legal Funding District

By Hawkins, B. Denise | Black Issues in Higher Education, April 2, 1995 | Go to article overview

Mississippi's Coahoma Community College Finally Gets Legal Funding District


Hawkins, B. Denise, Black Issues in Higher Education


Mississippi's Coahoma Community College Finally Gets Legal Funding. District

by B. Denise Hawkins

For nearly 50 years, Mississippi's only historically Black community college has managed to exist despite one of the most glaring remnants of its racially segregated past -- the absence of a legal funding district.

But after years of lobbying, Mississippi's legislature passed a bill late last month legally designating Coahoma County one of the college's funding districts. The college will also share Bolivar County with Mississippi Delta Community College and share Quitman, Tunica and Tallahatchie Counties with Northwest Mississippi Community College.

"We are extremely excited about the new legislation," says Coahoma Community College (CCC) President Dr. Vivian M. Presley, who quickly adds that the small campus located in the economically and academically depressed Mississippi Delta region, "still won't be on parity with other public community colleges."

For example, the majority of Coahoma's funding comes from the federal government through grants, which often exceed contributions from the state. When the college is referred to in Mississippi's state legislative code, it is not by name, but by description, says Presley.

The code reads: "...existing publicly operated junior college, lying in and operated by a county bordering on the Mississippi River."

After years of wrangling, "What we came up with was a compromise, but Northwest [Mississippi Community College] wanted no part of the compromise although they knew it was the fair thing to do," Presley says.

Tax funds from Quitman, Tunica and Tallahatchie to CCC will be prorated until the end of the fiscal year. Beginning July 1, 1996, the college will equally split funds with Northwest Mississippi, says Rep. Willie Simmons (D-13th District), one of the chief authors of the legislation.

"This is an example of Mississippi state legislature responding to a college need that needed to be corrected," says Dr. Olan Ray, executive director of Mississippi's State Board for Community and Junior Colleges.

Ray said passage of the bill was successful now because of the "evolution of new leadership and thinking in the state. People are finding that it is no longer convenient to ignore things that have been ignored...doing the right thing had more to do with the legislation than anything else."

But as often as some of Mississippi's college officials and politicians "tried to close their eyes to the racial disparity that clearly existed at Coahoma for years," CCC officials and members of the legislative Black Caucus fought to unravel the past, says Presley. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mississippi's Coahoma Community College Finally Gets Legal Funding District
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.