Overcoming Segregation in Alabama Becomes Responsibility of HBCUs: Community College Embroiled in Desegregation Issue

By Hollis, Mike | Black Issues in Higher Education, April 17, 1997 | Go to article overview

Overcoming Segregation in Alabama Becomes Responsibility of HBCUs: Community College Embroiled in Desegregation Issue


Hollis, Mike, Black Issues in Higher Education


Overcoming Segregation in Alabama Becomes Responsibility of HBCUs:. Community College Embroiled in Desegregation Issue

HUNTSVILLE, Alabama -- Jamie Fleming is like other non-traditional college students in several ways. He has a wife and a nineteen-month-old son. He has a full-time job and he commutes more than 240 miles a week to attend classes. But until Fleming, who graduated from an all-white high school on rural Sand Mountain, Alabama, enrolled at Northeast Alabama State Community College on a scholarship, he had never sat in a classroom with an African American.

Now Fleming, a twenty-three-year-old junior majoring in secondary education, is attending historically Black Alabama A&M University in Huntsville, Alabama, as part of a court-ordered program designed to attract white students. The scholarship he receives is one of the desegregation remedies that grew from a case the U.S. Justice Department brought against Alabama in 1981 in an effort to eliminate vestiges of segregation in its colleges and universities.

Three trials and fifteen years later, U.S. District Judge Harold Murphy told the state its responsibility includes giving Alabama A&M and Alabama State University in Montgomery up to $1 million a year each for ten years for scholarships to recruit white students.

Murphy did not ask the mostly white schools that shared the focus of the 1995 trial to take further steps to increase minority enrollment or faculty. As a result, some officials -- like James Cox, a member of Alabama State's board of trustees -- found Murphy's 1,000-page decree a paradox because little of the burden for integration has fallen on Alabama's white schools.

"None of us are completely satisfied with the court order," said Cox, "but we will adhere to it."

Scholarships and Enrollment

Alabama State, which offers scholarships to graduate students as well as undergraduate, has increased its white enrollment to 600 this past fall -- up from 397 in the fall of 1995, when its enrollment was more than 7.5 percent white.

In Alabama A&M's bachelor's degree programs, white enrollment has hovered between 5 and 6 percent in recent years, officials said. This past fall, approximately 225 of Alabama A&M's 4,200 undergraduates were white, according to James Heyward, director of admissions.

However, scholarships are not available to white graduate students at Alabama A&M because for years it has attracted large numbers of white students, many in education, to study for master's degrees and advanced teaching certificates. Alabama A&M reports that about half of the 1,500 students in its graduate school classes are white.

"A scholarship is just a thing to be used as a catalyst to try to get the university to resemble the population of society at large in this section of the state," Heyward said.

In the 1995 trial, the two institutions argued that they should get more resources for more courses to help make up for what they did not get during segregation. The additional resources would be used to better serve Black students as well as to attract more white students. Alabama State now has several doctoral and master's degree programs. Alabama A&M also has new engineering programs.

Heyward sees a benefit to the court order. By bringing in more whites, he believes that those students will see -- and tell others -- that many of the misconceptions about African Americans and the education available at HBCUs are just that --misconceptions.

"Oftentimes, people say things and they don't know always [whether] what they are saying is true," said Heyward. "These students like Jamie, for instance, will be able to counteract that. They will be able to say that, `Hey, wait a minute. That's not true. I was there. I went to school at A&M. Don't tell me that.'"

In addition to the money for the scholarship programs, each school will receive $1 million a year for fifteen years for endowment funds. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Overcoming Segregation in Alabama Becomes Responsibility of HBCUs: Community College Embroiled in Desegregation Issue
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.