Books


Because they face fewer commercial demands than other publishers, university presses frequently offer books of interest to specialized audiences. Interest in AfricanAmerican studies has also added to the growing list of such books. Here is a sampling.

Women in the Civil Rights Movement: and Torchbearers, edited by Vicki L. Crawford, Jacqueline Anne Ross and Barbara Woods from Indiana University Press, "helps break the gender line that restricted women in civil rights history to background and backstage roles," according to Julian Bond. This seminal work puts black women in their proper place in civil rights history. The essays about Ella Baker, Septima Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer, Gloria Richardson, Modjeska Simkins, Mary Church Terrell and others offer readers a fresh look at who the movement's makers were.

For fall 1999 the New Press offers history you can read and hear in Remembering Slavery: African-Americans Talk About Their Personal Experiences of Slavery and Emancipation, edited by Ira Berlin, Marc Favreau and Steven E Miller, a book-and-audio tape published in conjunction with the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian Institution. In the few original recordings of former slaves recounting their own experiences, listeners and readers can hear st-avery told in the words of those who experienced it firsthand. The Washington Post calls it "chillit."

Also from New Press comes David Cole's No Equal Justice: Race and Class in the American Criminal Justice System, called "bold and breathtaking" by The Washington Post and "a powerful indictment of the criminal justice system" by The Christian Science Monitor.

In the aftermath of the World Series, baseball addicts will want Catching Dreams: My Life in the Negro Baseball Leagues by Frazier "Slow" Robinson, with Paul Bauer, from Syracuse University Press. The New York Times says, "His use of language, at once poetic and unvarnished, is a joy." From the same press, poetry lovers will enjoy Spirit and Flames: an Anthology of African-American Poetry, edited by Keith Gilyard. Publisher's Weekly says it "outlines the depth and breath of black poets working in the 1990s."

A Companion to "Slow" Robinson's nasetiall memoir is Brushing Back Jim Crow: The Integration of Minor League Baseball in the American South by Bruce Adelson, University Press of Virginia.

The Virginia Press, most famous recent book - Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemmings: An American Controversy by Annette Gordon-Reed - has been updated with a new preface to reflect DNA evidence. While Gordon-Reed doesn't prove Thomas Jefferson fathered Hemmings' children, she does prove that all the evidence that said he didn't was bogus, a failure of white historians to grant black oral testimony the same weight as similar testimony from whites.

The University Press of Mississippi offers a wide variety of fides. jordana Y. …

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