TLC Announces Library Automation Contracts

Information Today, February 2000 | Go to article overview

TLC Announces Library Automation Contracts


The Library Corp. (TLC) has announced that the National Library of Medicine (NLM), the world's largest medical library, has contracted for a customized version of TLC's Library.Request to provide interlibrary loan (ILL) management via ISO 10160/10161 version 2 Protocol. This installation will enable ISO 10 160/61 Protocol interface with more than 3,000 U.S. and Canadian medical libraries. In a separate announcement, TLC said it will provide its Library.Solution automation system to 12 libraries in North Carolina.

National Library of Medicine

To date, NLM's automated interlibrary loan request and referral system, DOCLINE, has been running on a mainframe computer. The DOCLINE system is being converted to a Web-based platform for handling NLM's more than 10,000 ILL transactions a day. Part of this transformation requires the ability to communicate with the medical libraries in a standard language. This is where Library.Request will be used.

"Library.Request is the bridge between libraries. It makes sure we are able to talk to each other," said Karen Casey, head of the information management section of NLM's Office of Computer and Communication Services.

TLC is providing an ISO-compliant Interface Server to act as an intermediary between the DOCLINE system and ISOcompliant ELL systems, according to Mark Wilson, TLC's director of research and development. "This gives ISO ILL a big step forward," he said. "It will be the standard that everyone will use. "

Casey said, "Most people are migrating to the ISO standard. Larger libraries are already there, and with the installation of this customized version of Library.Request designed for our needs, we have taken an important first step in enabling seamless sharing with libraries throughout North America."

ILL requests require both parties, the loaner and borrower, to communicate via standardized messages known as application protocol data units (APDUs). The ISO will accept, decode, and store all APDUs received from the compliant partners, regardless of whether the partner is a requester or responder. The stored data will contain status and time stamps that will provide to DOCLINE the information necessary to periodically retrieve new requests and status information. DOCLINE will then retrieve the information from the ISO tables and act on it accordingly. According to the announcement, TLC is working closely with the NLM staff to ensure libraries have a robust interface with NLM.

The National Library of Medicine, on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, is the world's largest medical library. The library collects materials in all areas of biomedicine and healthcare, as well as works on biomedical aspects of technology; the humanities; and the physical, life, and social sciences. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

TLC Announces Library Automation Contracts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.