Book Reviews

By Mezey, Nancy | Transformations, March 31, 1998 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews


Mezey, Nancy, Transformations


Book Reviews

Burns, A. August, Ronnie Lovich, Jane Maxwell, and Katharine Shapiro. Where Women Have No Doctor: A Health Guide for Women. Berkeley, California: The Hesperian Foundation, 1997. Paperback. $22.01.

Farmer, Paul, Margaret Connors, and Janie Simmons (eds.). Women, Poverty, and AIDS: Sex, Drugs, and Structural Violence. Monroe, Maine: Common Courage Press, 1996. Paperback. $19.95.

Harcourt, Wendy (ed.) Power, Reproduction and Gender: The Intergenerational Transfer of Knowledge. Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey: Zed Books, 1997. Paperback. $22.50.

The three books reviewed below address important global issues concerning women's sexuality, and reproductive, general, and mental health. They address how unequal power relations, particularly across gender and economic lines, affect women's lives and experiences.

The collection of essays, Power, Reproduction and Gender, edited by Wendy Harcourt, focuses on several themes: the inter- and intra-generational transfer of knowledge concerning reproduction, women's sexuality, and gender relations. The essays situate the main foci within the context of the global economy and modernity. Using a feminist perspective that attempts to move away from Euro-centric feminist biases, the book presents seven case studies to cover three main concerns: 1) the influence of modern economic and social trends; 2) changes in knowledge of the body and sexual practices and behavior; and 3) a need to redefine the reproductive health agenda and policy. The case studies each begin with an overview of the country in which the study was conducted, helping to situate the reader in the appropriate social, political, cultural, and historical context.

In the opening chapter, Harcourt discusses myths that often dominate discussions about women and reproductive issues. Harcourt critiques several conventional social science frameworks addressing key analytical considerations, including a discussion about how to think about "women" on a global level. On the one hand, Harcourt recognizes the harm in universalizing the category of "woman." She recognizes that unequal gender relations both locally and globally create patterns of gender inequalities. On the other hand, Harcourt also presents the life cycle as a key differentiating factor in women's lives. Thus, in addition to examining differences of race and class among women, this book emphasizes the importance of age and generation.

The first case study (Tanzania), by Bright Obrist Van Eeuwijk and Susan Mlangwa, focuses on how adolescent sexual activity and teenage pregnancy in Tanzania are perceived and addressed by policy makers, health planners, women activists, and teenagers and their families. The authors examine and critique competing medical, traditionalist-moral, and feminist ideologies about female sexuality and emphasize that Tanzanian teenage girls do not receive accurate information about reproductive issues. The authors conclude with a list of recommendations to help facilitate more accurate and useful knowledge transfer.

The second case study (Ghana), presented by Miranda N. Greenstreet and R.A. Banibensu, examines how adolescent girls in Ghana receive knowledge about sexuality. It also examines marital relations in Ghana as they pertain to reproductive issues. Finally it looks at how modernity shapes sexual matters and shows how modernity is weakening the ties between grandmothers and granddaughters, as younger girls are looking more to schools and peers for reproductive information. The authors also focus on the complex nature of gendered power relations. They suggest that men, in addition to women, must take responsibility for the proper education of adolescent girls regarding sexuality issues.

In the third case study (Brazil), Jacqueline Pitanguy and Cecilia de Mello e Souza examine social, cultural, and economic aspects of domestic work in Brazil to show the interconnections of gender, class, work, and reproductive decisions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Book Reviews
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.