Palestinian Cameramen Covering Hebron Are Targeted by Israeli Soldiers and Settlers

By Meehan, Maureen | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, December 1998 | Go to article overview

Palestinian Cameramen Covering Hebron Are Targeted by Israeli Soldiers and Settlers


Meehan, Maureen, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Palestinian Cameramen Covering Hebron Are Targeted by Israeli Soldiers and Settlers

Several cameramen and photographers gathered around the bed of Husam Abu Alam, a Palestinian cameraman working for Agence France Presse, at the Al-Ahli hospital in Hebron where he is recovering from emergency brain surgery to remove a rubber-coated plastic bullet from his head. Although they know his head is aching and he is obviously drowsy, his colleagues joke and try to cheer him up.

"We almost lost him and we want to be near him now," said one of the photographers as he passes a tray of juice around to visitors.

Husam, 42 years old and a father of four, was shot in the back of the head by an Israeli sharpshooter on Oct. 8 during violent clashes in Hebron.

"I was aware the sharpshooter was about 25 meters behind me but I never dreamed he'd fire. He could see we were filming an injured boy who'd just been shot," said Husam in a strained voice. "There was no reason for the soldiers to have shot at me."

Mazen Dana, cameraman and reporter for Reuters News, saw the shooting. "There were no stones being thrown at that moment when we were filming the boy who'd been shot. We heard a gunshot and Husam fell forward and landed on his forehead right on top of his camera lens. The close range and size of the bullet hole in his head made us think he was dead. We were stunned."

Husam was rushed in critical condition to the hospital, where he underwent lifesaving surgery for skull fractures, fragmented bone and hematoma in the brain. "Frankly, it's a miracle," said Abdula Hussein, head nurse at Hebron's Al-Ahli hospital. "He's lucky to be alive."

Mazen Dana said if the shooting had not been done by a sharpshooter, the official Israeli explanation that it was an accident might make more sense. "But given the history of treatment of Palestinian cameramen and photographers, it is quite clear that we are targets."

The astounding number of shootings, beatings, broken cameras, arrests and threats on Hebron-based Palestinians working for foreign media tells a story in itself.

Na'el Shyoukih, 27 years old and working as a Reuters cameraman for four years, was shot in the head, neck, back and leg on March 13 of this year. It was evening, the end of a day of disturbances. With the rioting over, nine cameramen and photographers were gathered together chatting in a well-lit spot on a street near the soldiers. Na'el was on his mobile phone informing the Reuters office in Jerusalem that the day's clashes were over and he and his colleagues were intending to leave the area.

"Just as I said goodbye to my office, the shooting started. I yelled in Hebrew that we are journalists and to stop shooting. They knew we were journalists...It was so obvious. Every one of us had cameras on our shoulders or hanging on our necks. Besides, they know us personally," said Na'el.

"I fell when the first bullet hit me in the head and they kept shooting at me. I was hit in the head, neck, leg and back. Before I lost consciousness, I realized three of my colleagues had come to help me and that the soldiers were shooting at them."

Mazen Dana took up the story: "Three of us put our cameras down to help Na'el, and the soldiers shot at us. We had to drag him out of the way behind a wall. Others immediately began filming. The entire incident is on tape."

Video tape of the incident shows all nine reporters were indeed in a well-lit spot and that the soldiers continued shooting at Na'el and those helping him. All nine reporters were hit with rubber-coated metal bullets that night. The incident created a stir in the Israeli media, but Defense Ministry officials said the nine reporters were mistaken for rioters.

"That is obviously a blatant lie and it's all on videotape. But we all know that Israeli soldiers, and settlers for that matter, can get away with murder," said Na'el, who spent one month in bed recovering from the head wound. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Palestinian Cameramen Covering Hebron Are Targeted by Israeli Soldiers and Settlers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.