Israeli Discrimination against Non-Jews Is Carefully Codified in State of Israel's Laws

By Shahak, Israel | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, February 1998 | Go to article overview

Israeli Discrimination against Non-Jews Is Carefully Codified in State of Israel's Laws


Shahak, Israel, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Israeli Discrimination Against Non-Jews Is Carefully Codified in State of Israel's Laws

The legal system of the State of Israel can be described as a weird mixture of advanced democracy and retrogressive discrimination, combined with clumsy attempts to hide the discriminatory reality. For example, in all Israeli laws except one, the Law of Return, the word "Jew" does not appear. The term employed when the law gives discriminatory privileges to Jews is that those privileges are granted to "persons who would have benefited from the Law of Return had they been outside the borders of Israel." The Law of Return specifies that its benefits can be given only to Jews. However, Israeli propagandists calculate, correctly in my view, that a great majority of the opponents of discrimination would not dare to criticize this law.

The second trick, especially beloved by the Meretz Party and other "leftist" hypocrites, is to campaign for and then pass a high-sounding law in favor of equality or human rights. Such laws, however, always contain one little paragraph stating that their provisions will not affect any laws or regulations enacted in the past. The high-sounding preambles of the new laws then can be solemnly quoted without mentioning that since discriminatory laws and rules were passed in the 1950s and early 1960s (by Labor, of course), the new laws cannot change the existing discrimination. When one understands those two tricks, one comprehends that Israeli laws, and even more so government regulations on all possible subjects, are full of discriminatory measures which, if employed against Jews anywhere else in the world, would, be regarded as anti-Semitic.

The greatest discrimination, regarded as an ideological duty, is practiced with regard to land. Before explaining the legal niceties, let me summarize the ideology involved. It still is inculcated in Jewish schools in Israel, as well as in the diaspora, although increasingly resented because of the increasing competition of Western ideologies and fashions. The key concept of this ideology, established in Zionism from its beginning and much stronger on its "left" than its right wing, is "redeeming the land."

It is supposed that landed property, whether urban or agricultural, in the Land of Israel (whatever its borders are) which does not belong to Jews, privately or collectively, is "unredeemed." When the ownership changes and it becomes owned by Jews, either privately or collectively, the land undergoes magical transformation and becomes "redeemed." (Let me add that these two terms have been taken from the Jewish religious law.)

According to Zionism the most important Jewish duty is to accomplish this magical change. Even some Zionists have recognized that this duty, as often happens with quasi-religious concepts, is unlimited in every respect.

For example, land owned by a Jewish gangster is "redeemed" land, but land owned by a non-Jew who helps Israel to the utmost is "unredeemed." There is also no limitation. All the land which is "unredeemed" should become "redeemed."

Dr. Irving Moskowitz, the American Jew who buys Arab-owned land in East Jerusalem for occupation by Jewish settlers, is quite right when he says that he acts in the spirit and according to the intentions of the Founding Fathers of Zionism.

Naturally, when Israel was ruled by the true believers in the Zionist faith, its laws and regulations were shaped accordingly, but also with due regard to the needs of Israeli propaganda. …

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