Former U.N. Human Rights Coordinator Speaks at CPAP

By Powell, Sara | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, February 2001 | Go to article overview

Former U.N. Human Rights Coordinator Speaks at CPAP


Powell, Sara, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


FORMER U.N. HUMAN RIGHTS COORDINATOR SPEAKS AT CPAP

On Dec. 7, the Center for Policy Analysis on Palestine, in conjunction with the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination League, hosted former United Nations Humanitarian Coordinator Hans von Sponeck, who presented an update on the condition of the people of Iraq, still under severe sanctions after 10 years.

Appointed by U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan following the resignation of Denis Halliday, von Sponeck also resigned after a frustrating year trying to negotiate an end to the sanctions imposed by the U.N., largely at the behest of Britain and the U.S., at the end of the Gulf war a decade ago. According to von Sponeck, Resolution 687 calls for an end to sanctions once Iraq has completed all actions called for in the original plan. However, the U.S. and Britain then introduced Resolution 1284, which calls for a mere 120-day suspension of sanctions, followed by further review on Iraq's compliance. Though London and Washington called this a step forward, Iraq obviously called it a step backward, and von Sponeck agrees. Once again, von Sponeck said, the U.S. and its allies are using a position of power to change the rules of a game already underway.

UNICEF reports that child mortality rates are considerably higher since sanctions have been in effect: in 1999 up to 131 deaths out of every 1,000 children under five years of age, meaning some 50,000 children die every year. Von Sponeck continued quoting the chilling statistics, pointing out that 142 Iraqi parents suffer a child's death every day.

Von Sponeck did mention that, just a few days prior to his appearance, the U.N. had condemned Iraq for its human rights record, and he agreed with the condemnation. He pointed out, however, that Iraq's poor record did not give the outside world the right also to abuse the human rights of the Iraqi people, who now were being doubly punished, both from within and from without--but mostly from without. Though most European governments have come out (albeit weakly) against the continuation of sanctions as being unequivocally illegal under international law, the U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Former U.N. Human Rights Coordinator Speaks at CPAP
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.