Jerusalem: Israel's New Golden Calf

By Gordon, Neve | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, July 1997 | Go to article overview

Jerusalem: Israel's New Golden Calf


Gordon, Neve, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Jerusalem: Israel's New Golden Calf

Picture a beautiful city which has a small neighborhood with nice little pubs and restaurants only five minutes walking distance from the downtown district. Imagine sitting in a chic bistro in that neighborhood, sipping cool draft beer while soft music plays in the background. You are with friends, talking about work, sports, or politics.

Continue with the image, and assume that less than 100 yards from the restaurant is a detention center. It is a warm April evening, and while you enjoy dessert, only the thick sound-proof walls of the cells keep you from hearing the screams of a political prisoner who is being tortured there.

Tragically, this is not an imaginary city but a real one, Jerusalem. On April 25, 1995, Abd al-Samad Harizat, a computer scientist, was "shaken" to death in the detention center known to Israelis as the Russian Compound, and to Palestinians as Jerusalem's Moscobiyyah. According to Amnesty International, a British forensic pathologist who attended the autopsy concluded: "There is no doubt whatsoever about the cause of death...he died from torture." Restaurants and pubs outside the prison were open that night, cheerfully serving their clientele. Harizat was not the first to die there.

It isn't hard to discern the deadly undercurrents which are at work in this city, the prevailing inequity between Jews and Palestinians, and the injustice it brings in its wake. Jerusalem is not the only "mixed city" where Palestinian residents are discriminated against -- Haifa, Jaffa and Acre are other examples. Yet, the abuses of Palestinians living in these cities hasn't been in quite the same league as that to which the East Jerusalemites have been subjected.

Jerusalem, one might also recall, differs from the other "mixed cities" because of its religious importance. Thus, there is a disturbing correlation between the spiritual significance of the city and the injustice taking place within it. This frightening convergence between the spiritual ethos and injustice is a direct consequence of Israel's 30-year-old imperative: the holiest city for the Jews must be dominated by the Jewish state regardless of any other considerations.

Accordingly, the objective of every Israeli government -- backed by the religious parties -- has been to gain full control of Jerusalem. This drive for mastery and domination of Jerusalem is at the root of Israel's effort to subjugate its Palestinian residents, and the many violations committed against them is a natural result of this objective. The decision to build 6,500 apartments on Har Homa is only the most recent indication of this strategy.

Deadly undercurrents are at work in this city.

B'Tselem, an Israeli information center for human rights, points out that in the past 30 years some 38,500 housing units were built on lands expropriated from Arabs, and taken over by Jews. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Jerusalem: Israel's New Golden Calf
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.