Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism, Religion, and Literature, 1600-1745

By Havran, Martin J. | The Catholic Historical Review, January 2000 | Go to article overview

Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism, Religion, and Literature, 1600-1745


Havran, Martin J., The Catholic Historical Review


Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism, Religion, and Literature, 1600-1745. By Raymond D. Tumbleson. (New York: Cambridge University Press. 1998. Pp. ix, 254. $54.95.)

This book, developed from a dissertation by an English professor at Kutztown University, examines anti-Catholic rhetoric during its heyday in England. Tumbleson had already published versions of substantial portions of this study in five essays or articles. Among his six chapters, Chapter 2, concerning Milton, Marvell, and Popery, and Chapter 4, called "The Science of Anglicanism," carry exactly or nearly exactly, the titles of earlier publications. On this account, literary scholars familiar with them likely would not have found his useful multidisciplinary approach (Harry Dickinson of Edinburgh was among the first to employ it in the 1970's) as innovative as I did. The reading was tough-going for me, mainly because of Tumbleson's elaborately constructed prose, but nevertheless, quite rewarding.

Tumbleson's theme is hardly unknown or unexpected. Every student of the period knows the degree to which English Protestants (Anglicans and Dissenters alike) wallowed in anti-Catholic sentiment and how that engine drove the nation toward mercantilism, heightened nationalism that was fed by a conviction that Catholicism was foreign and tyrannical (France, Italy and the Papacy), provided a justification for some reconfiguration of Anglicanism, helped to precipitate the Glorious Revolution, and led English Protestants to equate Protestantism with freedom from foreign domination and relief from autocratic, centralized government. What began essentially with the publication of the Elizabethan Foxes Book of Martyrs, which commanded attention for centuries and had two fundamental themes-the satanic evil of Rome and the sacredness of monarchy-was promoted by strenuous Calvinists under the early Stuarts and became a national obsession during the Restoration and Augustan ages. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism, Religion, and Literature, 1600-1745
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.