The Big Picture

Vocational Education Journal, September 1994 | Go to article overview

The Big Picture


Many veteran teachers are eyeing technology movement now gathering momentum in schools with a certain amount of skepticism. They remember the 1980s when computers were supposed to revolutionize instruction and instead mostly became glorified typewriters or electronic workbooks. Worse, computers sometimes just gathered dust on shelves as they quickly became obsolete.

Times are different now, of course.

Computers are smaller, more affordable and much more powerful. The machines can open doors to whole new worlds of information and experiences.

How can schools make this technology available to all students while avoiding the pitfalls of the 1980s?

Some states are addressing the issue with comprehensive plans that attempt to provide guidelines to local schools about what to purchase, help educators learn how to use and maintain equipment and ensure equal access for all students. North Carolina is one of these states. Its overall goal is for all students in all schools to be able to independently use technology.

North Carolina plans its own information highway that will link Departments of Public Instruction, Correction and Justice; community colleges, universities and medical centers; area health centers and the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina. Some departments already are networked. Depending on the amount of money that the state Legislature appropriates, anywhere from 25 to 100 more agencies and schools are expected to come online this fall.

Before that happens, the state has to organize all the players. It already has a good foundation, as students have been using computers and engaging in distance learning since the early 1980s. Teachers are assured, however, that the plan for the 1990s and beyond will focus not simply on the number of computers in schools but on a comprehensive system of technology-based work stations.

THE VISION THING

The 1994 technology plan of the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction represents the thinking of a diverse group of North Carolinians. Some of the participants included the Department of Public Instruction's technology task force, the Governor's Advisory Council on Telecommunications, state technology planning committees and the North Carolina Science and Math Alliance. Local school districts developed technology plans that helped shape the statewide objectives.

The plan is expected to consolidate the previous work of technology-schooling advocates and to indicate the commitment of the Department of Public Instruction to provide a necessary framework for schools.

Schools set their own priorities and may choose to fund initiatives other than those involving technology, although most want to put money toward the purchase of needed equipment and materials.

Schools that want to be considered as a connection site for the information highway must submit technology plans that show how they will support one or more of these state objectives:

* change definitions and perceptions of schools and schooling;

* provide more opportunities for students to master advanced skills, practice effective communication and work individually and collaboratively on real-world tasks;

* change teacher roles and activities;

* change administrators' roles so they can better manage resources and communication and provide stronger school-community leadership; and

* improve assessment methods.

Technology plans are a good start toward resolving the problems caused by the willy-nilly purchase of equipment. Someone in each school must assume responsibility as "technology plan coordinator" and name a team to help out. In the plan, schools must state their vision and what they hope to achieve, including short-and long-term goals and objectives. They must determine overall equipment needs, evaluate the abilities of students and staff to use hardware and software and decide whether the facility needs physical modifications to be ready for new equipment. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Big Picture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.