The Gospel of Matthew

By Steffen, Daniel S. | Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, December 2003 | Go to article overview

The Gospel of Matthew


Steffen, Daniel S., Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society


The Gospel of Matthew. By Rudolf Schnackenburg. Translated by Robert R. Barr. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2002, vii + 329 pp., $24.00 paper.

During the last two decades there has been a proliferation of study on the Gospel of Matthew filling a void for good exegetical and background material. A new book on Matthew must break new ground on some specific issue, incorporate the gains that have been already accomplished, or explain to a lay audience the discoveries of the past. Doing none of the above, this book speaks to a lay audience without giving sufficient attention to these discoveries.

This commentary by Rudolf Schnackenburg is intended for a non-technical reader and makes an attempt to summarize the conclusions of form and redaction criticism in an interpretation of the text of Matthew. The introduction of thirteen pages attempts to quickly summarize issues of sources; Sitz im Leben; the relationship between Israel, Judaism, and the church; and brief treatments of some additional theological themes in the Gospel. The commentary offers a translation which ignores text-critical options. The translation at times is unique without defense, and the following commentary may actually contradict the translation. The commentary discussion, divided by the paragraphs of the text, offers the author's insights into each paragraph without observations on the overall argument of major sections.

The approach involves source, form, and redaction criticism, none of which is explained to the reader. It assumes that the lay audience is familiar with critical titles for the sources behind the Matthean text: i.e. Q, "sayings source," M, Mark. However, there is no defense of the approach or explanation. The underlying assumption is that the text must be divided into its various layers of sources before the reader knows what was important to the Matthean community. Editorial changes that were made to previous sources are attributed to the final author and to his community. Although this is the overall approach, the book offers no comprehensive picture of the nature of the Matthean community. The method fails to recognize that all of the material contained in the text (not just the final editorial process) had pastoral importance to the author and his community. Schnackenburg emphasizes the sources and the editorial process of the text but fails to treat adequately the final message.

Schnackenburg asserts, without making a strong case, that the Matthean community is mainly Jewish Christian with Gentiles present. However, he maintains that Matthew is anti-Jewish and that the new community has replaced Israel to the extent that there is no future for the "ancient people of God" (Matt 2:3-4; 8:11-12; 13:54-58; 21:18-22; 23:37-39; pp. 7, 13, 23, 83, 137, 204, 205, 235). This anti-Jewish interpretation of Matthew has many adherents, but it is unacceptable to argue that Jewish Christians in the first century were anti-Jewish and did not identify themselves as the true Israel in continuation with the Israel of the past. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Gospel of Matthew
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.