Two Fond Farewells and Thank Yous

By Murata, Stephen K. | Medical Economics, September 26, 1994 | Go to article overview

Two Fond Farewells and Thank Yous


Murata, Stephen K., Medical Economics


Two staffers whose names have appeared on our masthead for move than a quarter of a century are retiring from day-to-day service on Medical Economics.

Senior Editor Lilian B. Fine has been a vital and vivacious member of our publication family for 33 years--almost half of the magazine's 71-year history. Starting as a proofreader in 1961, she quickly showed her great drive and powers of persuasion and soon took over responsibility for all outside copy procurement.

Ever since, Lilian has been almost single-handedly responsible for bringing to our pages all those great stories doctors share with their colleagues. While these compelling narratives carry the physicians' bylines, you can be sure that Lilian regularly initiated and helped shape them.

Many of those stories began as submissions to our annual article-writing contest. Each year, Lilian and her assistant Helen McKenna have received, reviewed, and responded to more than 400--sometimes 500--entries. In coordination with a board of reviewers, Lilian selected the 100 or so manuscripts that best fit the magazine's needs.

Over the years, Lilian's duties expanded to include handling the hundreds of "permission requests" from other publications and organizations asking to cite some of our articles. Lilian also arranged a number of roundtable meetings that drew experts from around the country.

However, her most awe-inspiring talent was her ability to work closely with doctor authors--coaxing, cajoling, and demanding their best work. At countless medical meetings, I encounter physicians who remember Lilian's powers of persuasion, sometimes even decades after she exercised them. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Two Fond Farewells and Thank Yous
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.