From the Editor

By Wright, Michael | Technology and Children, May 2000 | Go to article overview

From the Editor


Wright, Michael, Technology and Children


Another school year is rapidly drawing to a close. So it is a time for reflection, planning, and anticipation. Reflection on what we have accomplished with the precious young minds and souls entrusted to us: reflection on the technological activities that we used to enrich our curriculum. And frankly, reflection on how we might improve those activities and experiences that we used to teach children about the technological world in which they live.

Planning inherently follows this reflection. Like you, I am already planning changes, improvements, and additions for next year. Planning new activities to enhance student learning. Hopefully, planning ways to incorporate some of the many wonderful suggestions included in Technology and Children this year!

Anticipation begins to almost overwhelm me at this time of the year as I actually work through the strategies to implement these plans anticipation about the "discovery learning" potential and the children's reactions; anticipation about new community contacts and resources to bring into the classroom; anticipation about new opportunities for collaborating witt colleagues.

Those of us involved with Technology and Children also share these feelings of reflection, planning, and anticipation. We believe that we have provided many creative, innovative, exciting, and realistic ideas on these pages this past year. We reflect on ways to improve, new ideas, and better ways to communicate.

This, the last issue of the school year, contains many awesome ideas and suggestions to incorporate into your classroom. Our featured Program in the Spotlight highlights some of the many technology education activities conducted by master teacher Linda Harpine. This article describes the wonderful technology program at Ottobine Elementary School in Virginia. Our second feature article, Camp Invention, describes a very creative approach to teaching children. Although originally begun as a program for teaching about science, they have come to recognize the strong symbiotic relationship that exists between science and technology.

In fact, it is almost impossible to separate them for young children discovering the process of invention and the world around them. …

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