People


A reporter on a routine weather assignment became part of the story when he saved a baby from a car sinking into a rainfilled ditch. General assignment reporter Kevin Kinnaird of the Evansville (Ind.) Courier & Press was working on a storm story on Jan. 3 when the Southern Indiana road he was on became flooded. Looking in the rear-view mirror of his vehicle, he spotted a small car slip nose-first into a flooded ditch. Kinnaird raced to the sinking car as the driver called out to him: "Take my baby, take my baby." The woman handed her 13-month-old son Isaiah to Kinnaird. The reporter carried the child to safety while another bystander rescued the mother, 24-year-old Mitzi Bolin. "I didn't think it was that great of a thing, really, but everyone else here did," Kinnaird said.

Les Goodstein, executive vice president and associate publisher of the New York Daily News since 1995, has been promoted to president and chief operating officer. "I'm pleased to be at the helm of such a great New York institution," Goodstein said. He has been with the paper for 22 years. In his new posts, which are newly created, he will be in charge of the paper's day-to-day operations. "Les has done an outstanding job at the News in all the years I've been associated with the paper," said News chairman and copublisher Mortimer Zuckerman, who made the announcement on Jan. 17. Ira Ellenthal, the CEO for U.S. News & World Report, will succeed Goodstein.

John McMeel, 63, who co-founded Universal Press Syndicate in 1970 and built it into one of the nation's three biggest syndicates, stepped down as president as of Feb. 10. Robert Daffy, 54, Universal's vice president of sales and director of new media, succeeded McMeel. Lee Salem, 53, is being promoted from vice president and editorial director to executive vice president and editor of the syndicate. Salem will be the first person to hold those two titles since Universal co-founder Jim Andrews died in 1980. `After 30 years as president, it's time for a change," McMeel said. He will remain the chairman and president of Andrews McMeel Universal, the syndicate's parent company.

Cathy Baron Tamraz, executive vice president of Business Wire, has been named to the newly-created position of chief operating officer, the company announced Jan. 13. Tamraz, a 20-year veteran at the company, will oversee the company's day-to-day operations, long-term strategic planning and global branding. "Cathy is a creative strategist who is one of the leading executives in our industry," said Lorry I. Lokey, president and founder of Business Wire. "She has propelled Business Wire to a level of excellence that has made us leaders in both market share and member satisfaction."

Los Angeles Times Editor Michael Parks said on Jan. 7 that his handling of a profit-sharing arrangement with the Staples Center was "naive" and "arrogant," but that he had decided not to quit. Parks elevated two of the paper's senior editors to newly created positions in an effort to redress newsroom management problems. Parks is turning over the newsroom's dayto-day operations to newly named executive editor Leo Wolinsky. Wolinsky was formerly the paper's managing editor. Ardith Hilliard, editor of the paper's Valley Edition, was named associate editor and assigned to implement a recently adopted set of guidelines to protect the newsroom's independence.

A.M. Rosenthal, fired from The New York Times last year, is resurfacing at the New York Daily News. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

People
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.