Johannes Cochlaeus: Philippicae I-VII

By Lewis, Keith | The Catholic Historical Review, April 2000 | Go to article overview

Johannes Cochlaeus: Philippicae I-VII


Lewis, Keith, The Catholic Historical Review


Johannes Cochlaeus: Philippicae 1-VII. Volume I: Text; Volume II; Introduction, Commentary, Bibliography, Appendices. Edited with Introduction and Commentary by Ralph Keen. (Bibliotheca Humanistica & Reformatorica, Volume LIV.] (Nieuwkoop: De Graaf Publishers. 1995. Pp. viii, 375; vii, 297. Hfl. 180,00.)

The Philippicae I-VII of Johannes Cochlaeus (1479-1552) is perhaps the most comprehensive contemporary critique of Philip Melanchthon's theology. The third-longest of the Polish-born controversial theologian's works, it was written in stages, and chronicles a long acquaintance with the theology of Melanchthon, which began in 1524 when Cochlaeus joined Friedrich Nausea and Johannes Faber in support of Cardinal Campeggio's efforts to defend Catholic doctrine.

The Philippicae Quattuor of 1534 mark Cochlaeus' debut as a published polemicist, and were written "for the sake of the Poles tempted with Wittenberg schemes." Cochlaeus had consulted Eck and Faber at the Diet of Augsburg in 1530 in order to prepare a refutation of the Augsburg Confession. It was also at this time that Cochlaeus had his first personal encounter with Melanchthon, whom Cochlaeus initially hoped to win over, but quickly came to regard as "the most dangerous enemy of the Roman Curia." The Philippicae Quattuor was a direct response to the theology of the Augsburg Confession, particularly Melanchthon's Apologia. Besides its obvious reference to Melanchthon, the title also emulates Demosthenes' Philippics, which exhorts the rulers of Athens to protect its citizens from enemies, as well as Cicero's Philippics. Philippica V appeared in 1540, in response to Melanchthon's On the Duty of Princes, that the Command of God Teaches them to Abolish Ecclesiastical Abuses. Cochlaeus is much more caustic than in the first four Philippicae, in part due to his belief that Melanchthon was responsible for his exile to Silesia after the death of his patron, George of Saxony but also in response to a more polemical tone in Melanchthon, who now referred to the Lutheran church as evangelical and the Roman Catholic Church as papist. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Johannes Cochlaeus: Philippicae I-VII
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.