#292

By Miller, Ben | Chicago Review, January 1, 2000 | Go to article overview

#292


Miller, Ben, Chicago Review


Now that I've capped the molar you're certainly free to go but for just a moment stop wiggling and consider the other oral areas that could use a bit of bolstering, the lower jaw, for instance, now that you're here I'd be glad to inject 10 ccs of steel into the bone to better prepare you to endure the indignities of aging, "There being fate. / There being luck. I But above all I the gas station wall calendar I the greasy, little swish / of a photo of a purple mountain I that eventually levels / the real thing...," taking care, certainly, to avoid the lingual nerve, the mythomania nerve, the hypnoglossal nerve and above all the inflated lovular, do I take the nodding of your wadding to be a yes? no? want to think about it? of course, of course, if a bit of fresh air would speed the process I'm sure Receptionist Weebold would be glad to walk you around the block, 56 leash and collar sets stashed in her desk, jeweled and unjeweled, leather and hemp, no? you'd rather stay here? well, that's fine too, just keep in mind that the marrow of misfortune is seldom more than the point of contact or the grointed sling of wambic petrifaction, but no use in getting specific, for in this era of increasing demand for despecialized specialists I too am a generalist, do a little welding, a little legal work, a little furniture making, a little poetry using only the equipment in this room, milking verse from the porcelain udder of the spittoon right over there, the latest being a ditty I call "Desire," "Before a tiger pounces / it hunkers down / as if to slip under / the law of gravity. // Before I pounce I I tilt my head back I to look up at the place / where I've always thought / there should be a mirror. …

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