When the Name of the Game Is Research

By Hurd, Hilary | Black Issues in Higher Education, May 8, 2003 | Go to article overview

When the Name of the Game Is Research


Hurd, Hilary, Black Issues in Higher Education


As they say in the academy, "publish or perish." That's music to some scholars' ears. Nothing is more interesting and causes such intellectual stimulation, yet at the same time causes such extreme frustration and stress than their own research -- and finding funding. Others would rather spend their energy teaching. And for some scholars, the publishing aspect of academia is what makes them head for the door, but not without their doctorate.

In this special report on research in higher education, we try to illuminate issues that exist for the individual researcher, as well as for institutions as a whole.

In Ronald Roach's article, "History's Burdens," he provides readers an overview of the federal government's push to make minority health and health disparities research a national priority, and how historically Black and majority White institutions have positioned themselves to carry out this important research agenda.

In "From the Ivory Tower to the Boardroom," Ben Hammer interviews Dr. Shahron Williams van Rooij, a Datatel executive who left academia, and armed with her doctorate decided to go the industry route. She enjoyed teaching, but was looking for a more practical application to her research. She has found the right match for her interests with her current employer, which still keeps her tied to the higher education market. She encourages all students to consider and weigh their options. …

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