LAST WORD: Becoming Presidential Timber Is No Small Order

By N, Leo | Black Issues in Higher Education, June 21, 2001 | Go to article overview

LAST WORD: Becoming Presidential Timber Is No Small Order


N, Leo, Black Issues in Higher Education


LAST WORD: Becoming Presidential Timber Is No Small Order

Over 13 years ago, I was a member of the search committee to find a president for my institution. More than 100 candidates vied to become the anointed one. The pool of candidates was first reduced to 20, then to six for interview purposes. A comment that was made by a member of the governing board, who was also a member of the search committee, still rings in my ears. As we were making our first reduction of the pool, the board member stated, rather emphatically, regarding one of the résumés, "This person is not presidential timber." The candidate being referenced had one of the most impressive résumés in the pool. Yet, according to the board member, this candidate was "not presidential timber."

Over the years, I have reached the conclusion that the board member had indeed made a very powerful point. He just might have been the most insightful member of the committee. Since that tune, I have spent many hours trying to figure out exactly what the board member meant. What had he seen that we hadn't? What is the real meaning of presidential timber? I now believe that certain characteristics can identify whether one has what it takes to be an effective college president.

- Integrity. For the aspiring president, demonstrating impeccable integrity throughout one's career is a must. Administrators may be able to overcome many bad decisions but never dishonesty, cheating or lying.

- Temperament. An even temper is virtuous. When the temperament of others is pushed to the limit, it is the calm and collected that usually are victorious in the long run.

- Relationships. Relationships are at the heart of presidential responsibilities and image building. Those who are able to establish and maintain effective relationships on and off campus will win many supporters. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

LAST WORD: Becoming Presidential Timber Is No Small Order
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.