The Girl Who Drowned Her Dolls Is Offered Silkworms

By Driscoll, Judy | Hecate, January 1, 1993 | Go to article overview

The Girl Who Drowned Her Dolls Is Offered Silkworms


Driscoll, Judy, Hecate


The Girl Who Drowned Her Dolls is Offered Silkworms

The silkworm has stopped eating,

her velvet cream body grown turgid

and pythonesque.

Yesterday she rose up and began

with her first four pairs of legs to describe

large and confident circles in the air,

extruding from her homely glands

the winding silk

of the white, mulberry moon;

this morning she is still just visible

on the other side of the wall,

her circles shorter and fainter.

With such fortitude must the hermit nun

in the lucid interval of her moony night,

have placed the last stones

in the cell of her incarceration.

Oh, brave little hunger striker, I thought,

may you terrify all the suburbs of the protestants

with your new born wings.

WRONG!

It is only children and newly delivered women

who are terrified by flying nuns.

Your genuine wing beating angel

has to be male.

Michael, Gabriel, Raphael!

Apollyon, Abbadon, Asmodeus!

Not a woman amongst the lot.

Couldn't you just hear it?

Arise O Lucia Fairy,

Angel of the Falls and Princess of Daftness!

And where would the little sisters

Michelline, Gabriella and Raffia be,

that bunch of feckless fairies?

Flitting about the forest

just begging to be feckled, I bet.

No, the only winged girl I ever saw

was the one so painfully impaled on a stick

at the top of my mother's Christmas tree

(Bride, Birdie or Bridget, maybe, but no angel).

For the genuine winged transformation

as the angel of any nation at all,

it is essential to pupate

as the transitional male

freedom fighter

and revolutionary

wheels within wheels

of Ezekiel's bikie

on the highway to heaven

with black leather jacket

and airforce boots

optional

(the essentially nervous starter may begin

with a new masculinist men's renewal group

or with a morris dance side, come to that.)

Ever since Apollo took over the Pythons,

the female pupations have not been fortunate.

If you were lucky, like Joan of Arc,

and kissed the male angel's sword,

you might get off with schizophrenia.

Otherwise, it would certainly go to

PENIS ENVY

(CHOP! CHOP!)

Go directly to raving in outer darkness

and begging for mortality.

Do not try to pass anything at all

and you won't be needing the two hundred pounds.

Appropriation of the larval form

is a very serious offence.

Didn't she get what she asked for, that mad

Star Bat the Mater Melusine,

zooming about her belfry tower,

wailing like the ban sidhe

for her really very odd children

and trailing her guilty glory.

Or consider the Parable

of Thomasine the Tank Engine,

elected freight yard delegate,

who challenged the Fat Controller

for the right to manage her own train:

ritually shunted up a side line,

her grease nipples cut off,

walled into a lightless tunnel,

is her spirit alive today? …

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