Hanan Ashrawi Delivers Distinguished Lecture at Inauguration of UCSB's Middle East Center

By McDonnell, Pat | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, June 30, 2001 | Go to article overview

Hanan Ashrawi Delivers Distinguished Lecture at Inauguration of UCSB's Middle East Center


McDonnell, Pat, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Hanan Ashrawi Delivers Distinguished Lecture at Inauguration of UCSB's Middle East Center

Pat McDonnell Twair is a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles.

"Our only guilt is to refuse to die in silence." So said Hanan Ashrawi before an audience of 750 at the inaugural Distinguished Lecture of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of California at Santa Barbara.

The pre-eminent orator of Palestinian issues was in California April 8 to present a landmark speech for which she received several standing ovations. Dr. Ashrawi discussed the oppression of the Palestinians under the world's longest military occupation, flaws of the failed peace process and the need for Palestinians to be under international protection.

Under the theme "Palestine: The Dual Challenge of Nation-Building and Making Peace," the University of Virginia-educated scholar said that, in 1991, Palestinians were under the assumption that a new paradigm for peace could be created on the basis of equality and nation-building.

However, Ashrawi said, from the onset of negotiations the Israelis claimed the Fourth Geneva Convention (on the inviolability of civilians and their property while under military occupation) did not apply to Palestinians because they are not a state.

"This is ridiculous," she stressed, "since this reasoning did not apply to stateless Holocaust victims.

"Never mind that U.N. Resolutions 242 and 338 called for a withdrawal to the 1967 borders, restoration of East Jerusalem and refugees--the Israelis wanted to renegotiate even these resolutions," she said. "Then, as Israel continued to carry out collective punitive actions of siege and closure of Palestinian communities, they were not held to any standard of accountability.

"When we protested to the United Nations, we were slapped by a [U.S.] veto," she stated.

With the break up of the Soviet Union, the peace process became the monopoly of the U.S., and Ashrawi said she found herself negotiating with U.S. representatives more than with Israelis.

"The Israelis would accept a measure we proposed," she recalled. "Then the Americans would tell us the same thing was unacceptable to the Israelis. Gradually, the Palestinian leadership was asked to sign agreements that violated Palestinian human rights. Our weakness was exploited."

Ashrawi also addressed the issue of the fragmentation of the Palestinian people and their land.

"For centuries, we gave proud names to the places we lived," she said. "Then our place names were replaced with letters of the alphabet: Area A, Area B or H1 or H2 in Hebron. Israel was to create settlement clusters that would separate and divide Palestinians living in the West Bank."

The ongoing Israeli refusal to implement signed agreements was another nail in the coffin of the peace process. "Not one agreement was implemented on the date it was specified to be, and every agreement was re-opened for further modification," she stated. "Finally, the process had no touch with reality. The Palestinians were disillusioned. The process was seen as an isolated entity that could only be approached from the perspective of what was good for Israel."

Security, she said, was applied only to the Israeli side: "There was no approach to human-based security and there was a denial of Palestinian human rights and security."

Ashrawi received a round of applause when she stated: "The idea that brute force and military assaults will lead to Palestinian capitulation will not happen."

Commenting that Israel's friends in the U.S. Congress regularly come up with bills that give away East Jerusalem, label Palestinians as terrorists or call for an end to aid to the Palestinians, Ashrawi said Washington gives Israel $6 billion each year, compared to the $100 million it agreed to pay the Palestinians. She received her second ovation when she noted, "We can live without that aid."

Another fallacy, she pointed out, is the belief that Palestinians will accept the notion that U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Hanan Ashrawi Delivers Distinguished Lecture at Inauguration of UCSB's Middle East Center
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.