Members of Congress Call for Lifting Economic Sanctions against Iraq

By C, Delinda | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, April 30, 2000 | Go to article overview

Members of Congress Call for Lifting Economic Sanctions against Iraq


C, Delinda, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


MEMBERS OF CONGRESS CALL FOR LIFTING ECONOMIC SANCTIONS AGAINST IRAQ

Democratic and Republican members of the U.S. Congress joined more than 10 Arab-American and American-Muslim groups at a Capitol Hill press conference on Feb. 16 to urge the United Nations and the Clinton administration to lift economic sanctions on Iraq. Sanctions were imposed against Iraq after the Gulf war more than nine years ago. In 1996 the U.N. set up an oil-for-food program to ensure that all Iraqi oil revenue is spent on humanitarian needs, but that program has failed and Iraqis are dying.

On Feb. 13 U.N. humanitarian coordinator in charge of the oil-for-food program in Iraq, Hans yon Sponeck, resigned after criticizing the sanctions for unjustly punishing the Iraqi people for the actions of a regime over which they have no control. He called the sanctions "a human tragedy." Two days later Julia Burghardt, who headed the World Food Program in Iraq, did the same. Denis Halliday, von Sponeck's predecessor, resigned in September 1998 to protest the economic sanctions and has become a leading campaigner to lift them.

Executive director of American Muslims for Global Peace and Justice Iman Farajallah welcomed the Congress members and the representatives of 11 co-sponsoring organizations as well as 34 endorsing organizations. Farajallah said support for the lifting of the devastating sanctions is growing as members of Congress add their names to a letter initiated by Reps. Tom Campbell (RCA), John Conyers (D-MI), and David Bonior (D-MI) calling on the president to end the sanctions against Iraq. At the time of the press conference the letter to President Clinton, dated Jan. 31, had been signed by 71 members of Congress.

American Muslims for Global Peace and Justice vice president Yousef Al-Yousef said the weak and vulnerable are suffering as a result of sanctions which have killed more than a million civilians, according to reports from the United Nation's Children's Fund and other U.N. agencies operating in Iraq. He described the U.N. oil-for food program as insufficient, under-funded and a complete failure.

House Democratic Whip Bonior, a strong congressional supporter of Muslims and Arabs, called the sanctions a weapon of mass destruction. "The children are the real victims of our economic sanctions against Iraq," said Bonior. Sanctions are "not just a moral outrage but a strategic blunder. It's high time we recognize that this embargo hasn't hurt Saddam Hussain or the pampered elite that supports him but has been devastating for millions of Iraqi people. It's infanticide masquerading as policy."

UNICEF reports that despite the U.N.'s oil-for-food program, several thousand children under the age of five die every month from disease and malnutrition, Bonior said. "Our message is simple. We're saying: millions of children are suffering and we refuse to close our eyes to the slaughter of innocents."

Senator Dennis Kucinich (D-OH) said that the sanctions are "not just counterproductive, but immoral. It could be argued that the sanctions have in fact strengthened the regime and weakened the people who would be needed to overthrow the regime. Our country is famous for standing up to dictators, but we're hurting ordinary citizens of Iraq, not their dictator," Kucinich said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Members of Congress Call for Lifting Economic Sanctions against Iraq
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.