Friends of Lebanon Promise Major Reconstruction Help

By McArthur, Shirl | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, March 31, 1997 | Go to article overview

Friends of Lebanon Promise Major Reconstruction Help


McArthur, Shirl, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Friends of Lebanon Promise Major Reconstruction Help

THE DEC. 16 MEETING of the Lebanon consultative group, "Friends of Lebanon," was long on promises but short on actual results. The meeting brought together representatives of 29 countries and eight international institutions who, according to press reports, pledged to support Lebanon's reconstruction efforts with more than $1 billion immediately and $2.2 billion eventually. Included in this amount is $20 million in 1997 from the U.S., consisting of $12 million in development aid, $6 million in agricultural credits, and $2.1 million for education, training, and social services (most of which reportedly will go to the American University of Beirut).

However, these numbers are only "estimates," and apparently an actual list of country pledges does not exist. This is partially because many of the countries simply repackaged programs or projects already earmarked for Lebanon. But, more than that, many of the pledges are not real money, but a hodge-podge of "capital flows" -- a mixture of grants, loans, credits, and loan guarantees -- so it is nearly impossible to tabulate them in comparable terms. As Lebanese Ambassador to the U.S. Riad Tabbarah said, "You mix together all these apples and oranges and you end up with 10 kilos of what?"

As might be expected from a senior diplomat, however, Tabbarah spoke very positively about the meeting, saying that he was particularly gratified with the high level of U.S. representation (President Clinton signed the letters of invitation, and Secretary of State Christopher headed the U.S. delegation), and the fact that nearly half of the country delegations were headed at the ministerial level. The Lebanese envoy also pointed out that this was the first Middle East economic conference that was not centered around the Arab-Israeli problem. Furthermore, Tabbarah was particularly pleased that the conference set in motion a process that he believes will have long-term benefits for Lebanon.

Prior to the meeting, Tabbarah had said he would be happy if it resulted in agreement to hold a series of meetings during the next few months between Lebanon and individual donor countries or organizations. That, he says, is exactly what has happened. As an example, he pointed out that Japan made no specific pledges during the meeting, but expressed interest in certain aspects of Lebanon's reconstruction efforts. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Friends of Lebanon Promise Major Reconstruction Help
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.