Celebrities Join 100,000 in Los Angeles Anti-War Protest

By McDonnell, Pat | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, April 2003 | Go to article overview

Celebrities Join 100,000 in Los Angeles Anti-War Protest


McDonnell, Pat, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


Angelica Houston, Martin Sheen, Jamie Lee Curtis, Mike Farrell, Gore Vidal and David Clennon were just a few of the celebrities who gathered Feb. 15 in front of Grauman's Chinese Theater on Hollywood Boulevard to march one and a half miles to a military recruitment center to protest the Bush administration's build-up for a pre-emptive war on Iraq.

As the crowds swelled, police admitted as many as 100,000 protesters were jamming Highland and Sunset Boulevard.

Three demonstrators were dressed in plastic sheeting and duct tape. Minister John Hickox wore a T-shirt emblazoned, "Old White Guy Against War." Other placards read: "There's a Terrorist Behind Every Bush," "Drop Bush Not Bombs," "Peace Takes Brains," and "Bush is to Christianity What Osama is to Islam."

The massive crowd roared its approval as Gore Vidal took the microphone on the ANSWER stage at Sunset and Highland.

"The whole world is wondering how the hell we got into this mess," stated the caustic author. "Three years ago, we had prosperity. No matter how corrupt the system has been, we still held onto the Constitution. I always felt the Republic was on such a firm foundation we would never see a day like this that we the people would march against an arbitrary and secret government. …

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