Rodney J. Carroll (2002). No Free Lunch: One Man's Journey from Welfare to the American Dream

By B, Christopher | Afro-Americans in New York Life and History, July 2003 | Go to article overview

Rodney J. Carroll (2002). No Free Lunch: One Man's Journey from Welfare to the American Dream


B, Christopher, Afro-Americans in New York Life and History


Introduction by President Bill Clinton. One World Ballantine Books, NY. ISBN 0-345-45229-1.

No Free Lunch is a memoir of Rodney Carroll's journey from growing up on welfare, to being President and CEO of the Welfare to Work Partnership. The story is compelling, true and difficult to put down.

The book begins with childhood memories of North Philadelphia. Rodney clearly describes the hardships he experienced, such as an absent father and an abusive & alcoholic mother who once sent him to the emergency room after hitting hit him in the head with a baseball bat. Rodney also takes us on a journey through North Philadelphia where gang members, hustlers and drug dealers are frequent role models. Rodney is fortunate enough to have had a very powerful role model in his grandmother. Her wisdom and guidance is pivotal to his growth.

The descriptions of coming of age as a teenager are chilling in their realism. The descriptions of how Rodney tries to avoid gangs and drugs help readers understand how difficult it is to "just say no." When Rodney refuses to join a gang, they spray paint gang messages designed to incite rival gangs to attack him. The ploy normally forces gang membership for protection but when it fails, the gang simply attacks Rodney and puts his head through a storefront window (the owner wants Rodney to pay for the damages). It is amazing Rodney wasn't killed for his convictions to pursue education and avoid gangs.

Not all of the challenges occur in the streets. Rodney always seemed to enjoy learning but several teachers demoralize him and one tells him he will never attend college. This is another place Rodney could have been derailed from his goals of education and escaping poverty. It is amazing Rodney did not become involved in drugs and he describes how close he came to doing just that.

After maneuvering past the traps, obstacles and danger zones in and outside school, Rodney takes a job at United Parcel Service. Rodney could have failed on his first day when UPS co-workers refused to help him `learn the ropes.' Instead, Rodney begins to show talents for improving work efficiency and for motivating people. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rodney J. Carroll (2002). No Free Lunch: One Man's Journey from Welfare to the American Dream
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.