Book Reviews -- Cajun Country (Folklife in the South Series, No. 1) by Barry Jean Ancelet, Jay Edwards and Glen Pitre with Additional Material by Carl Brasseux, Fred B. Kniffen, Maida Bergeron, Janet Shoemaker and Mathe Allain

By Litoff, Judy Barrett; Smith, David C. | Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA), Spring 1994 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews -- Cajun Country (Folklife in the South Series, No. 1) by Barry Jean Ancelet, Jay Edwards and Glen Pitre with Additional Material by Carl Brasseux, Fred B. Kniffen, Maida Bergeron, Janet Shoemaker and Mathe Allain


Litoff, Judy Barrett, Smith, David C., Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA)


Barry Jean Ancelet, Jay Edwards and Glen Pitre with additional material by Carl Brasseaux, Fred B. Kniffen, Maida Bergeron, Janet Shoemaker and Mathe Allain. Cajun Country. Folklife in the South Series, No. 1. Jackson and London: University Press of Mississippi, 1991. 256 pp.

About a decade ago, the National Park Service began an extensive project to provide a detailed study of all aspects of life in the area of Jean LaFitte National Historic Park in the southern region of the Mississippi Delta. In 1987, the researchers for that project produced a five-volume report, The Cajuns, Their History and Culture. The marvelous book under review, a distillation of the five-volume report, makes the results of the larger study available to the general reader. If a way could only have been found to impregnate a few of the pages with the odors of Cajun cooking, it would be an absolutely perfect book. Indeed, Cajun Country is one of the best books on its subject available today.

The authors are all persons known for their precise research, their willingness to dig for difficult-to-locate sources and their astute analysis of the materials they locate. Cajun Country demonstrates these qualities. It is carefully written and based on solid research, and the analysis is at the cutting edge of knowledge. The maps, figures and architectural drawings, as well as a remarkable selection of some 43 photographs, illuminate and extend the textual analysis.

The first section of the book, "History," examines the origins of the Cajuns, the first settlements in Louisiana, the evolution of a local society and Cajun folklife. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Book Reviews -- Cajun Country (Folklife in the South Series, No. 1) by Barry Jean Ancelet, Jay Edwards and Glen Pitre with Additional Material by Carl Brasseux, Fred B. Kniffen, Maida Bergeron, Janet Shoemaker and Mathe Allain
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.