Electronic Media Reviews -- "The Nixon Interviews with David Frost" (Volumes I-V)

By Allen, Craig | Journalism History, Spring 1994 | Go to article overview

Electronic Media Reviews -- "The Nixon Interviews with David Frost" (Volumes I-V)


Allen, Craig, Journalism History


"The Nixon Interviews With David Frost." Hollywood: MCA/Universal Home Video, 1977, 1993. 6:10 in five volumes (VHS). $19.98/volume. Volumes: I Watergate; II. The World; III. War at Home an Abroad; IV. The Final Days; V. The Missing 18 1/2 Minutes.

Only twice did Richard Nixon offer an explanation for his role in the Watergate scandal. One occasion was his 1978 memoirs. The other was in a series of interviews conducted by British journalist David Frost in April-May 1977. Happily for historians, the Frost interviews now have been released for non-broadcast use by MCA/Universal Home Video. The series consists of five volumes, including two about Nixon's diplomacy and handling of domestic unrest, topics he did later discuss. Unique, though, are the volumes "Watergate," "The Missing 18 Minutes," and "The Final Days," in which Nixon, for the only time in his life, publicly relives the demise of his presidency.

The Richard Nixon in these programs is not the Churchillian figure captured in his final years on the Larry King Show and in other benign appearances. Confronted by Frost, for example, Nixon provides some of his most candid observations about the press. He proclaims the 1964 New York Times v. Sullivan decision "a license for the media to lie" and urges, "Let's not have all this sanctimonious business about the poor, repressed press....When they take on any public figure,...I think the public figure ought to come back and crack them in the puss." He did not read an account of his downfall by Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein "because I knew the kind of trash it was and the kind of trash they are."

In the same vein is Nixon's account of Watergate. "There was no cover-up," he maintains. When pressed by Frost for an apology, Nixon claims he gave one by accepting Gerald Ford's pardon. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Electronic Media Reviews -- "The Nixon Interviews with David Frost" (Volumes I-V)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.