Memorials: Daniel Craig Stevens

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, March 2004 | Go to article overview

Memorials: Daniel Craig Stevens


Daniel Craig Stevens was born in Akron, OH, on August 31, 1946, the first of four children born to James and Helen Stevens, an optometrist and an optician who worked together. The family moved to Kettering, OH when Daniel was in the fourth grade. After graduation from Fairmont High School in 1964, Daniel attended Bob Jones University in Greenville, SC, for two years before completing his B.A. at Cedarville College, Cedarville, OH, in 1969. Further education included a Th.M. degree from Dallas Theological Seminary (1973) and a Ph.D. from Ohio State University (1982).

On june 13, 1970, Daniel and Suzanne O'Shell were married at Berea Baptist Church in Berea, OH. They met in a class at Cedarville. After pastoring the Charity Baptist Church in McClain, VA, Dan, Sue, and their son Matthew, moved back to Cedarville College, where Dan served as alumni coordinator from 1974-78. Dan taught Christian Education at Grand Rapids College and Seminary from 1978-85, then served as chair of the Christian Education Department at Western Seminary, Portland, OR from 1985-89.

Moving to Southern California, Daniel worked for the Grace Theological Seminary extension program during its final year, and then served as director of the Doctor of Education program at Talbot School of Theology in La Mirada, CA, then as Assistant Dean of Continuing Education at Biola-Talbot from 1990-2002. …

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