Editorial: The Studies Invited Lecture, 2000

By Parsons, Michael | Studies in Art Education, Fall 2000 | Go to article overview

Editorial: The Studies Invited Lecture, 2000


Parsons, Michael, Studies in Art Education


This issue contains articles on a variety of topics, reflecting the variety of concerns and activities of the readership, or of those who care to submit material to the journal. There is a discussion of new ways of teaching interpretation by Jane Gooding-Brown; a suggestion for an approach to research in the history of art education by Theresa Marches and a report of a case study of teaching African art history by Jacqueline Chanda and Ashlee Basinger. There is also an analysis of Dutch studies of the effects of arts programs on subsequent student success in school by Folkert Haanstra. This was written in response to last year's call for papers on the topic: what are the consequences of study in the arts for achievement in other school subjects? In addition, we find space for a commentary by Mary Stokrocki on a previous article about historical research in the Southwestern U.S. and book reviews by Sharon La Pierre and John H. White. This is a healthy mixture that reflects a variety of writing styles and research traditions and suggests the vitality of current writing in art education. It is a pleasure to be the editor of a journal that can publish such variety.

This time it is especially a pleasure to publish the piece by Terry Barrett on art interpretation for art education. As you know, every year the editorial board of Studies invites someone to deliver a lecture at the annual meeting of the NAEA. This year the Annual Studies Invited Lecturer was Terry Barrett and it was my privilege to introduce him to the audience. Terry Barrett is recognized throughout the country, I think, for his tireless work explaining, analyzing, exemplifying his views on what art criticism is and how we can best teach students to do it. He is well known as a teacher of art criticism himself. He has long been a critic-inthe-schools for the Ohio Arts Council, has won the Distinguished Teaching Award at the Ohio State University, and consults nationally on a number of curriculum projects involving art criticism in public schools. He has served a Visiting Scholar at the Getty Institute for Education in the Arts and has taught at a number of North American universities in a visiting capacity. …

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