NoveList

By Felix, Kathie | MultiMedia Schools, November/December 2000 | Go to article overview

NoveList


Felix, Kathie, MultiMedia Schools


Located online at http://novelist. epnet.com/.

Company: EBSCO Publishing, 10 Estes Street, Ipswich, MA 01938; Phone: 800/653-2727; Fax: 978/356-- 6565; Technical Support: 800/653-2726; E-mail: esrn@epnet.com; Web site: http://www.epnet.com/.

Access Fee: $500-system license (all libraries in a specific system; includes single library systems), annual subscription. The system license includes remote access for verified library patrons. $750-individual building license, annual subscription. Both licenses include CD-ROM access, if needed.

Audience: Public and school librarians, K-12 teachers, students, and parents.

Format: Web site with text and database.

System Requirements: A computer with an Internet connection and Web browser.

Description: NoveList is a readers' advisory Web site that allows users to find fiction authors and their works by searching categories including author, title, subject, keyword, plot, and award-winning fiction. The site features areas designed specifically for librarians and teachers. Links to author Web sites are available.

Reviewer Comments:

Installation/Access: The site loaded immediately and was easy to access once the password was inserted. Installation/Access Rating: A

Content/Features. NoveList initially can be described with numbers. At the time of this review, the site included 90,000 fiction titles for preschool to adult readers, 41,000 titles with narrative descriptions, 17,000 different subject headings, 14,000 full-text Booklist reviews, and 1,200 theme-oriented booklists. Subject access is available for all fiction titles reviewed in Booklist, Library Journal, School Library Journal, Kirkus, and Publisher's Weekly from January 1996 to the present.

The site is updated quarterly. The publisher is committed to adding approximately 10,000 new fiction records to the database annually.

The September 2000 update added 2,000 titles to the database (for a total of 92,000 fiction titles) and full-text reviews from Booklist, School Library Journal, Library Journal, and Publisher's Weekly for a total of 30,000 reviews from these sources. The reviews, for readers of all ages, cover picture books and children's books, as well as young adult and adult titles.

Additional new material added 150 award lists and links to 1,000 fiction-- related Web sites.

The update also included lesson plans for literature-based classroom activities. Found in the "For Staff Only" area, the activities use the NoveList database and feature an activity overview, teacher notes, procedures for students to follow, and ideas for student projects.

The activities focus on popular titles such as To Kill a Mockingbird and Lord of the Flies, as well as subjects such as Earth Science, with a unit that locates fiction titles that cover earthquakes, volcanoes, and tidal waves. Students are then asked to determine if the portrayals of these events are scientifically accurate.

The site also features classroom-tested ideas to encourage independent reading and writing skill practice.

NoveList opens with a home page that includes current and archived headline-related topics, best- seller lists, and NoveList newsletters. Recent headline sections included "Ready for Sydney?," an examination of Australia in preparation for the Olympics, and "Time Travel and the Hugo Awards,"a look at science fiction.

Users can select a reading level from four options: adult, young adult, children's, easy. Multiple levels may be selected, but the site encourages users to choose only one level at a time.

The search screen allows users to match a favorite author or title, describe a plot, browse subjects, explore fiction by genre (science fiction, mysteries and thrillers, fantasy, adventure, romance, westerns, or horror), and examine award-winning and bestselling fiction. …

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