International News


AUSTRALIA

New South Wales Police will create an expert panel to use DNA evidence to review old cases where convicted persons continue to claim innocence and where forensic samples still exist. The panel will include a senior legal officer and representatives of the Privacy Commissioner, police, Department of Public Prosecutions and victims of crime groups.

The Victoria Police Association called for more funds to end overcrowding in jail cells. The Association claims there are more than 300 prisoners in police cells, only about half of whom have been sentenced. A government spokesman said 357 beds would be added to the prison system in the next 18 months.

BRITAIN

A paper given to cabinet ministers as part of the Department for Trade and Industry's Foresight program predicted it may be possible in the next 20 years for police scientists to view images held in the brain for a short time after death. "Neuro-chemical technology may provide access to the memories of the living and possibly the recently deceased," the document said. It said the breakthrough would be possible through cybernetics, which offers the possibility of integrating technology into the human body.

The Home Office's Police Scientific Development Branch released an easyto-use handbook giving advice and help on the latest techniques, chemicals and processes to recover fingerprints and detect crime. The handbook will be sold to police all over the world and is recommended by the International Association for Identification as a key publication. Some 4,000 scenes of crimes officers in Britain will receive a free copy.

The Home Office has proposed changes to the law to allow the recruiting of police officers from other countries in the European Union. Under the present law, officers have to be British citizens and police are exempt from European Union legislation that gives nationals of one EU country the right to apply for jobs in another. Police services said they would welcome the change.

There are proposals to establish a specialist team of detectives to investigate serious race crimes in England, Scotland and Wales. Association of Chief Police Officers of Scotland's general policing committee chairman Andrew Brown said in an interview that there are attractions to having a body to look at the matter of race crime in a sense wider than possible within individual force areas. Local officers would continue to be.involved in the investigation.

CANADA

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Ontario Securities Commission agreed to establish a joint RCMP/OSC Securities Fraud Unit. …

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