U.S.-Russian Strategic Stability Cooperation Initiative

Arms Control Today, October 2000 | Go to article overview

U.S.-Russian Strategic Stability Cooperation Initiative


U.S. President Bill Clinton and Russian President Vladimir Putin approved the "Strategic Stability Cooperation Initiative" at the United Nations Millennium Summit in New York September 6. The document contains a joint statement in which both sides reaffirm their support for a range of existing arms control agreements and objectives, followed by an "implementation plan" that recommits the countries to undertake and extend a range of existing initiatives in the field of arm-is control and non-proliferation. (For more information on the initiative, see p. 26.)

The "implementation plan" covers ongoing and future co

operation on theater missile defense testing, missile non-proliferation, verification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, and progress on a shared early-warning center and a bilateral ballistic missile prelaunch notification agreement.

The "Strategic Stability Cooperation Initiative" builds on two prior statements: the "Joint Statement on Principles of Strategic Stability," signed in Moscow June 4, and the "Joint Statement on Cooperation on Strategic Stability," adopted at the Okinawa Group of Eight summit July 21. These two statements and the latest initiative are intended to formalize understandings reached during ongoing bilateral talks between senior US. and Russian officials.

JOINT STATEMENT

STRATEGIC STABILITY COOPERATION INITIATIVE

President William Jefferson Clinton of the United States of America and President Vladimir Putin of the Russian Federation met today in New York and agreed on a Strategic Stability Cooperation Initiative as a constructive basis for strengthening trust between the two sides and for further development of agreed measures to enhance strategic stability and to counter the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, missiles and missile technologies worldwide. In furtherance of this initiative, the two Presidents approved an implementation plan developed by their experts as a basis for continuing this work.

The Strategic Stability Cooperation Initiative builds on the Presidents' agreement in their two previous meetings. The Joint Statement on Principles of Strategic Stability, adopted in Moscow on June 4, 2000, and the Joint Statement on Cooperation on Strategic Stability, adopted in Okinawa on July 21, 2000, establish a constructive basis for progress in further reducing nuclear weapons arsenals, preserving and strengthening the ABM [Anti-Ballistic Missile] Treaty, and confronting new challenges to international security. The United States and Russia reaffirm their commitment to the ABM Treaty as a cornerstone of strategic stability. The United States and Russia intend to implement the provisions of the START I and INF [Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces] Treaties, to seek early entry into force of the START II Treaty and its related Protocol, the 1997 New York agreements on ABM issues and the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty [CTBT], and to work towards the early realization of the 1997 Helsinki Joint Statement on Parameters on Future Reductions in Nuclear Forces. The United States and Russia also intend to seek new forms of cooperation in the area of non-proliferation of missiles and missile technologies with a view to strengthening international security and maintaining strategic stability within the framework of the Strategic Stability Cooperation Initiative between our two countries.

The Strategic Stability Cooperation Initiative could include, along with expansion of existing programs, new initiatives aimed at strengthening the security of our two countries and of the entire world community and without prejudice to the security of any state.

START III Treaty and ABM Treaty. The United States and Russia have presented their approaches to the principal provisions of the START III Treaty and on ABM issues. The United States and Russia have held intensified discussions on further reductions in strategic offensive forces within the framework of a future START III Treaty and on ABM issues, with a view to initiating negotiations expeditiously, in accordance with the Moscow Joint Statement of September 2,1998, the Cologne Joint Statement of June 20,1999 and the Okinawa Joint Statement of July 21, 2000 by the two Presidents. …

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