Current and Preservice Teachers' Knowledge and Attitudes about HIV Positive Students: Examination in a Southern Rural Community

By Zagumny, Matthew J.; Fuller, Andrea J. | Educational Research Quarterly, September 2000 | Go to article overview

Current and Preservice Teachers' Knowledge and Attitudes about HIV Positive Students: Examination in a Southern Rural Community


Zagumny, Matthew J., Fuller, Andrea J., Educational Research Quarterly


This study assessed current and future educators' knowledge of HIV/AIDS and attitudes toward students with HIV/AIDS (SWHAs), including blame of social contact with, managing situations involving SWHAs. Support for mandated and additional HIV/AIDS training at the university level. One hundred, twenty current and preservice elementary and secondary educators (30 per group) responded to the knowledge and attitude survey. Results showed that current teachers reported less willingness for social contact with an HIV positive student compared with preservice teachers (p < .01). Results also showed that younger and more knowledgeable respondents reported more favorable attitudes toward HIV/AIDS training for teachers. Preservice secondary teachers reported more favorable attitudes toward HI V/AIDS training than current secondary teachers (p < .018) and older respondents assigned significantly more blame of an HIV positive student than younger respondents (p < .003). A nationwide comprehensive health education curriculum is advocated for preservice teachers and in-service training for current teachers.

Today HIV/AIDS has spread to American youth at an alarming rate. From 1995 to 1997 HIV infections have increased by 27% in 5 to 12 year olds and by 26% in 13 to 19 year olds (CDC, 1998). Compared with a 19% increase in total HIV infections in the US during the same period, it is clear that youth and adolescents are being disproportionately affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The increasing number of children infected with HIV/AIDS accentuates the need for effective HIV/AIDS prevention education in our school systems. In a survey of special educators, 88% said they expected to have an HIV positive student in their classroom at some point in their careers (Prater, Serna, Sileo, & Katz, 1995). In addition, because earlier identification and advances in treatment have improved the survival rate of pediatricacquired HIV patients, more of these children will require special education services (Armstrong, Seidel, & Swales, 1993). To deal with the pediatric epidemic in this country, it is critical that teachers have knowledge about HIV/AIDS and skills to foster intellectual growth among all students including those living with HIV/AIDS.

Previous research indicates educators have insufficient knowledge of HIV/AIDS and preconceived misconceptions about HIV positive persons. In a study examining Israeli teachers' attitudes toward students infected with HIV, nearly 40% of the teachers who responded reported they felt an HIV positive student should be kept out of the school system. Sixty-six percent reported they would not perform mouth-tomouth resuscitation on an HIV positive hemophilic student after he or she had stopped breathing on a school field trip (Brook, 1994).

Similar findings in American samples suggest teachers need to learn more about issues affecting HIV positive students (Boscarino & DiClemente, 1996; Ellis & Torabi, 1992; Glenister, Castiglia, Kanski, & Haughey, 1990). Even a majority of American School Health Association members reported the need for more training on HIV issues, more information on developing programs with community based organizations (CBOs) and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and help with defining appropriate HIV/AIDS education in schools (Kerr, Allensworth, & Gayle, 1989). Not surprisingly, the highest levels of discomfort came from discussing issues of homosexuality, bisexuality, explicit sexual behaviors, and death.

Researchers, educators, and physicians have advocated that teachers share the responsibility of educating our youth, particularly adolescents, about HIV and AIDS (e.g., AAP, 1998; Tonks, 1993). A nation-wide survey conducted by the American School Health Association in 1994 showed that nearly 80% of all states and over 80% of all school districts in the US sample require that schools offer HIV prevention education (Collins, et al. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Current and Preservice Teachers' Knowledge and Attitudes about HIV Positive Students: Examination in a Southern Rural Community
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.