Pro-American, Pro-European

By Mandelson, Peter | The World Today, November 2000 | Go to article overview

Pro-American, Pro-European


Mandelson, Peter, The World Today


Europe and the US, two of the great unions that shape and define the modern world, are more closely allied than ever. We live within a shared community of values - respect for the rule of law, democracy and economic freedom are bound together not in a federal United States of Europe, but a union of nation-states that embody those values. Since its early inception the EU has sought to create peace and stability, and the commitment of the US to that is greatly appreciated. Yet there are some articulate voices all too ready to argue that the assumptions we have made and I grew up with are out of date. People on both sides of the ocean who claim the transatlantic relationship is redundant, and that NATO is simply a relic of the Cold War, either because, for the US, Asia and Latin America must now take precedence or, for Europe, because we don't have so much use for our American partners anymore.

MY BACKGROUND in politics is pro-American and Atlanticist. Not for me the temptations of neutralism, pacifism and unilateralism. I never believed that our friendship was only based on a shared mutual fear. Our relationship is richer than that - embedded in a common culture and a shared civilisation.

That shared civilisation saw the US defend European democracy against fascism and communism in the last century. It was the US through the Marshall Plan that saved Europe from post-war collapse and encouraged those early seeds of European reconciliation and unity. Ever since successive American administrations have given unwavering support to European integration. I share that enthusiasm for building greater unity in Europe.

In Britain - the European country with which America has the deepest relationship - there is a challenge that for some presents a contradiction, but for me represents a complementarity at the heart of my politics. While we want and need to deepen the relationship with America, the government of Prime Minister Tony Blair is devoting much of its time to developing ties with its European partners. On the right this has sparked a commotion among those politicians who cannot reconcile themselves to Britain's future in Europe and hanker instead for a renewed transatlantic relationship on the sole basis of a special relationship between Britain and the US.

I reject those views. I believe that, far from being washed up, the transatlantic relationship has a great future; that European unity does not have to be at the expense of stronger EU-US ties and that, as far as Britain is concerned we can play a unique role in cementing them. We can be the bridge between Europe and the United States, but only if we fully commit ourselves to constructive engagement in Europe.

I reject pessimism about the transatlantic relationship. The end of the Cold War and its fears and insecurities has not resulted in continental drift or the end of NATO. Far from the Alliance cleaving apart, we have a renewed emphasis on its importance.

This is a product of globalisation and the growing interdependence of countries and regional blocs in which people to people, cultural and societal links are becoming as important if not more so than traditional defence and trade ones.

Atlanticists should see this emerging world as a challenge and not a threat. No longer is our relationship configured by fear of Soviet aggression. Instead, there is an opportunity to put transatlantic relations on to a new plane, with the new economy and the wider conditions of security, now the driving forces.

HALF THE WORLD'S OUTPUT

Consider the economic facts. Trade between Europe and America stands at $1 billion per day, the most interdependent relationship in the world. Together we produce over half the world's output. A quarter of our trade is with each other. This trade is growing at the rate often percent a year. European Union (EU) investment in the US stands at $1/2 trillion, supporting seven million US jobs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Pro-American, Pro-European
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.