Patriotism, Power and Print: National Consciousness in Tudor England

By Frontani, Michael R. | Journalism History, Spring 2004 | Go to article overview

Patriotism, Power and Print: National Consciousness in Tudor England


Frontani, Michael R., Journalism History


Brennan, Gillian. Patriotism, Power and Print: National Consciousness in Tudor England. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press, 2003. 160 pp. $60.

Gillian Brennan's Patriotism, Power and Print is a thorough, well-researched history of the concepts of "patriotism" and "nationalism" in Tudor England. Working from pamphlets, treatises, and various forms of religious and political propaganda, she provides a convincing repudiation of what has become the accepted narrative for the spread of English dominance throughout the British Isles and its national history vis-a-vis the rest of Europe.

Among her notable conclusions are some well proven claims: the proliferation of the English language throughout Great Britain came not so much through the imposition of English imperial will but rather through the necessity of governance of an uneducated populace by a widely-dispersed judiciary and administration directed from London; die use of the vernacular in England was less a matter of an intentional monarchical strategy to foster national unity than a need to keep order; the translation of the Bible into the various vernaculars of the nascent island kingdom was far from unanimously applauded among English elites; and the function of English in solidifying Protestant control was often less an intention to define the country as a Protestant stronghold than, again, a necessary strategy for retaining control over a realm plagued by sectarian strife and political avance.

Brennan turns first to the topic of patriotism, pointing out that numerous threads of political thought at the beginning of the sixteenth century came together to create a patriotic environment. Notably, there was a transition among educated elites from a provincial or international culture towards a greater awareness of national interest. Particularly important to this development were the ideals espoused by the "commonwealthmen," who, under the influence of civic humanism, dedicated their writings to the bolstering of the monarchy. The pamphlets and treatises published by the commonwealthmen coincided with Henry VIII's own propaganda needs following the break with Rome: the 153Os were a period in winch the monarchy became identified with the nation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Patriotism, Power and Print: National Consciousness in Tudor England
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.