Kabul Law Students Compete in "Lawyers' Olympics"

By Hanley, Delinda | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, June 2004 | Go to article overview

Kabul Law Students Compete in "Lawyers' Olympics"


Hanley, Delinda, Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


For the first time, law students from the University of Kabul in Afghanistan came to the United States to participate in the Philip C. Jessup Moot Court competition in Washington, DC, from March 28 through April 3. For the past 45 years top law schools have sent four-member teams to participate in mock trials before the International Court of Justice. The first Afghan students ever to take part in the contest were Hekmatullah, Nezamuddin, and Mohammad Haroon. At the last moment, fellow team member Mohammed Nader was not granted a U.S. visa, and, as a result, the team was heavily penalized because it only had three members. The Afghan team did, however, receive the most vociferous round of applause when its members were announced at the start of the competition, which attracted more than 520 law students from around the world. The Afghan competitors came in 74th out of 99 teams and earned the "Spirit of the Jessup Award."

This trip represents how far Afghanistan has come in its effort to reconstruct a judicial system that was in desperate need of repair. The physical infrastructure-the courthouses and legal office buildingss, legal training and education centers, the law enforcement building, and even the legal texts themselves-were mostly destroyed after decades of war and life under Taliban rule. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Kabul Law Students Compete in "Lawyers' Olympics"
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.