Research Advocacy

By Okiishi, Ted | ASEE Prism, July 1, 2004 | Go to article overview

Research Advocacy


Okiishi, Ted, ASEE Prism


I would like to draw your attention to a council within ASEE that can help you be a successful engineering researcher. The Engineering Research Council (ERC) wants to advocate for actions that will promote research as a vital component of engineering education and I urge you to associate with the council and its activities. The ERC is described in detail at www.asee.org/erc. Find out who your institutional representative to the ERC is and work with that person to learn more about how you can get engaged and "weigh in."

To encourage engineering researchers 40 and younger as of June 30 of any award year, the Curtis W. McGraw Research Award was established in 1957 and is bestowed annually, (www.asee.org/awards/nominationinfo/council.cfm). The ERC currently selects this honoree from a number of nominees to recognize early, high-quality achievement by young engineering college researchers and to encourage the continuation of such productivity. The award consists of a $1,000 honorarium and an additional $500 to defray the cost of travel to the annual ERC forum banquet, where the presentation is made. This award is an excellent opportunity for more senior engineering researchers to honor their younger colleagues who deserve recognition.

The ERC also sponsors the Research Administration Award (www.asee.org/awards/nominationinfo/council.cfm) to honor: achievement in developing and supporting programs that lead to substantial engineering research success by colleagues; distinction in design and implementation of a major engineering research initiative that has a substantial positive institutional impact; effective promotion of engineering research and development excellence; and major innovation in the administration of engineering research excellence. This award is an excellent means for senior engineering academic leaders (e.g. deans) to honor their research administrators and the good work they do.

Numerous brief columns authored by ERC members have appeared over the years in PRiSM (www.asee.org/erc/html/news.html). From the following titles alone, you can tell these articles are thoughtful and thought provoking: "Marketing Your Research Strengths," March 1998; "Writing Your First Grant Proposal," October 1998; "Embracing Industry," February 1999; "A Little Help From Your Friends," January 2000; "The Tenure Track Years," September 2000; "Tapping Uncle Sam's Coffers," December 2000; "Intellectual Property: A Boon or a Pain? …

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